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Episode · 5 months ago

30 Years of Rohrbach Brewing

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Jim and Matt are at the German House in Rochester NY joining in of Rohrbach Brewing's 30-year anniversary celebration. At the party, Jim and Matt speak with Democrat and Chronicle beer columnist Will Cleveland, Marshall Street Bar and Grill owner Don Bush, Rohrbach's Head Chef Brian Arliss , Brewer Bruce Lish and the owner and founder of Rohrbach's John Urlab.

It's time to take your grilling skills to the next level. We will take you from grill disaster to grill master. So grab your tongues, your aprons and your pink glasses. Get ready to grill this with Matt Wilson and Jim Salmon. Hey, welcome to grill list everybody. We're at the old German House and downtown Rochester, New York, the original German House, to help roarbockx brewery and our good buddy John earlob celebrate thirty years in business. And this building right here is exactly where it started back in one thousand nine hundred and ninety one thirty years, Jim, that's amazing. I don't I don't know if anyone besides like genesee brewing, has been involved more with craft beer than you know, anywhere else. I think General Lob is the godfather of craft beer without a doubt, and he was the very first craft brewery in Rochester, New York, and back when it wasn't all that popularity yet. I'm he led the way towards what we have today and there's craft breweries out there inventing the greatest beers you ever had in your life. All over the place and in a lot of ways it's because John was the leader and made to pass forward. It's awesome. I think this is well deserved. They honestly deserved us all this stuff. This is a milestone and they're so important to this community and all the other brewers that are out there who have started because of their influence. I think it's fantastic and I do too. And you know, I walked in here tonight and my my biggest problem was deciding which beer, which roar box beer, I wanted, and it's for me it's always the Scotch ail. But I understand we have some very interesting beers here tonight. Then you and I got to dive into I'm looking forward to Sam when you're right. There's robucks as their classic beers. They have their scotch ail, their highland logger, their IPA's, they got a space kitty. That's that's been selling for a while, but they're doing some new stuff too. We're going to throw all that stuff out. They really are. I was talking to John Earlab earlier tonight and as he's going around greeting all the people that he just loves the pieces that that go to roar bocks on a regular basis and he said Hey, Jim, did you try the sour yet? ha ha ha ha. So we have to track that down. Roger, that I'm looking for to get started. This is grill this, Matt Wilson, Jim Salmon. My Day was some beers. Yeah, on the road, on the road once again, with the right back row bocks brewery celebrating thirty years. Wow, that's excellent. And you know what, one of the guys that inspired me to go on my beer crusades is right next to me. It's the great will Cleveland. Well, are you doing, brother? I wonderful. Are you guys doing? I'm doing well. This is thirty years of robots. Lets in. The coolest part is it's in the spot where it all started, right, right, started in the basement of the German house, right right eight hundred and ninety one. And the fact that they're having the thirty anniversary celebration and this spot, I just you know, like I how comes all comes full circles just where the cool. It's like nostalgic home exactly. Yeah, it's really, really cool. So well, what are you drinking there? All Right now, I'm drinking their thirty anniversary beer, which is there. There their take on the Scotch Ail, but they did it with banana's foster ingredients. So it's just it's like the bandas not overdone and I just want to like grow a scoup of vanille ice cream in. I'm just like, I'm shocked how much I'm really enjoying this, because I'm not a big Ed junk guy. You know, sometimes it's just over the top. I want my beer to taste like beer and this, still with the banana flavors and some the other Ed junks, still tastes like beer. So I'm really, really enjoying it. I have a question for speaking of that, because you're rires Lo. There's The a lot of different beers out now. There's a lot of heavy fruited sours and ice cream and milk stolets. My question, I've asked a lot of people all you're a beer enthusiast. You've been doing this for a while. Do you think any of this is fad or do you think it's here to stay? See, like, maybe two years ago I would have told you it's a fad, but I mean look at more Talis. They just celebrated the third anniversary and and and they're showing no signs of slowing down. Like, even during a pandemic, they're growing, like they've completely ripped out their tap room and added more fermentation capacity, a canning line, a centrifuge, I...

...mean because they're they're selling so much of these beers, you know, heavily footed hours, the big adjunct dessert pastry stouts, hazy IPAs, and they're doing so phenomenally well that even during a pandemic, without a tavern being open, they're growing. So, I mean if if you were to ask me this question two years or I would say, yeah, there's no way this isn't a fad. Like, are people going to get sick of this? Are Thinking, I want bear the tastes like beer, but the fact that you still see like some of these bries that are like embraced in this and growing. You know, fifth frame does a great job of those beers. I love that. The rooms. Yeah, absolutely. I mean iron tug makes great fruited sours, rises, stormed on, Laboni makes incredible loves risers. Don't get that hip hop aspect to it, which it completely yeah. So, I mean, no, these beers are the other making beers that people want to drink, and it's really cool to watch because, I mean, these places are all being supported so well, even during the pandemic. So you're the Democrat and chronicle food just shit a fishing out of you. Don't call you a critic. Right, fair beer calumnist. All right, we have an incredible food and drinking culture reporter, Tracy Schumacher, who does just an amazing job, you know, highlighting new restaurant openings, looking at, you know, different trends, and I mean, I'm the fact that I get to work with someone like her is just, you know, pinch me, because it's really cool that work with someone who's that phenomenally talented. Talk up with the great will, Cleveland will. So we're talking about thirty years of robots. What were when? The first beer festivals I ever went to was like early two thousand. It was a flower. So you proof festival also? Yes, that's it. Yes. So, yeah, do you want to know those beer festivals in the right I'm ninety five or ninety six, I believe I was an ask here. are think the original of the of the festivals out here? You think they have to be. I mean so that festival rigid. I want to say it's one thousand Nin hundred and ninety five. At Sonoburg Gardens on Candego is where they held the first one and then it moved a bunch of different spots, the high falls spot. I was at frontier field first, what second and now they have this incredible venue over at the Rocher public market. So they were one of the originators and like making you know, brewers and like the people who are like really behind the beer available. Because, like, when you go to the festivals like that, a lot of times it's just, you know, like a beer rap or like some volunteer pouring the beer. But when you go to the robot flower city brewers best, you know, usually every August you're actually getting the beer poured by the person who made the beer. So the fact that you can like have x that person you know from all over the state and be able to like nerd out, ask questions and just they've always done so much to support the scene and that just like one of the examples you know pretty much well. Nobody's been out to more crap breweries and you had. So when you go out there, what do you. I mean what your passion stouts ips? What kind of a what do you look for? You know what, honestly, I'm just a huge logger guy. I like a really, really nicely wellmade pilsner. I love like traditional Belgian styles, Personal Anglo styles. But, Michael, when I go to a brewery as I want to, I like to see variety, like I want to see a breed do a number of different styles really, really well. That's why, you know, when you go to a place like, say, gred beer works, are you go to heroes or go to three heads? Are you know any of those, any of those kind of places in the city that just do variety so well? That makes me really excited. You know, they can do a like a really Trish, traditional crisp blogger as well as they can do a hazy IPA or as well as they can do, you know, Anglo special bitterer, you know, or something like that. So I love writing and I'm a big I'm a big fan of flights and just, you know, getting a sample as many beers as as I can. Really now, you know, the this is grow, this is girl this. So we all, we pare food with beer. What's your favorite kind of food to eat with you having a beverage. You know, honestly, like my favorite pairing is pretty simple. I love a really nice IPA, especially it's got a little bitterness, with like a like a mildly spicy pepperoni pizza, like nothing, like, nothing fancy, like I'm not like get or like a pills there with a pizza, like I I'm not really good at food bearings. I just know, like if the beer taste good in the food ASTC good, I'm gonna be really happy. Yeah, it's great. You're listening to girl. This is available on Ihir, Madia, sounder, apple, pretty much anywhere you get your podcast. We're talking...

...to the great will Cleveland from the Democrat and chronicle, right. So well, another question for yourself. Recently I was out in Buffalo. The the Craft Rus Association put on a Beer Festival there. They're doing one in Syracuse. If you're one in all the other later on. They do a fantastic job and you get to see different kinds of brewers. I recently want you frof bing. It's insane and I've also seen what I'm liking, because it one thing that I've always looked for I've seen a growth and female and minority everything in bold and the beer. What's your whicheah, what's your thought process? Isn't that awesome? Like, beer is a social beverage, right, you know, the best part about beer is sharing beer with someone. You're fond of sharing a beer with a friend. So the fact that beer is finally getting its act together and like trying to involve as many people as possible and having like difficult conversations, like, you know, it's for too long it's been just a white man's beverage, right, you know, especially with craft beer. So the fact that they're doing so much more and like looking in with within themselves saying like okay, like we want to be inclusive, we want to like involve as many people as possible, like what can we do to fix this? What can we do to to introduce us to as many people as possible? So the fact that beers like is, I mean, it's long overdue, honestly, but the fact that a lot of these difficult conversations they're taking place just as it makes me so happy because, you know, I want everyone, I want everyone to enjoy beer as much as I do. You know, I try to. I try to show that my writing. You know, I try to write like, you know, a simple like. I don't get too Nerdy, I don't get like too technical. Usually, you know, I want I want like, you know, the the biggest beer stop, to the new be to, you know, be able to like comprehend what I'm writing about. And I think beers kind of having that reckoning right now where you see like they're, you know, the kind of the me to thing that's been going on, you know, with the black is beautiful beers, and just you know that we're started to buy weather souls down there and and in San Antonio. So it's just it's awesome to see like the fact that beer is starting to like look at itself and saying hey, like what do we need to fix, like how do we how do we become better? And I really really appreciate that and I think it's so very important. Well, there's one thing I'm getting out of this. We gotta have will Cleveland in the studio doing a whole girl with what I I think. So I'm a huge fan of I got one more question. We working for it because it because I want us all to have beers. I thirsty and I got you know I'm saying, I'm holding. So as far as the whole marketing approach of Beer, like we just talked about how they are trying to everyone, they're doing more festivals. I went to the French fest which, unfortunately, that kind of broke apart. There doing something else. Now. What do you think can be done to market towards everyone? Which I think that I think now a good jobs being done. I mean it's it's they're they're doing better. Right, they're doing better. There's still so much I need to be done. Like you need to diversify the ownership of breweries, like I think we wrote. We wrote about it. I think it was, I want to say, with August is two thousand and twenty. I wrote with USA Day reporter Mike Snyder. We wrote an article looking at, you know, like what's going on with with minority ownership and breweries, and I, and I can't remember the exact sat off that my head, but I mean it was something like three percent our own bye bye by black people, and I think, I think, I think it's even less than that, honestly, if I remember the exact stat so I think, I think once you do more to diversify the ownership and diversify the people work in breweries, you know, because, I mean it's the whole credible messenger thing, right. You know, people are more after listen to someone that looks like them. You know what I mean. It has a lot to do with like, you know, like the covid you know, messaging like. You know it mean if you have like a white guy like me telling me, telling you to like look at something, you know, if I'm not from well, well, well, I'll listen to you, will I appreciate that. But if, but I mean if I'm not from your community, you know, I mean maybe you're not going to listen to me as much as you know, you might listen to, you know, Garrett Oliver from Brooklyn Brewery or or any of the number of...

...black folks who are doing a lot more to, you know, espouse on these messages and and and and diversify. So I think a lot of it has to be done from internally, like it needs to be done like you need to remove a lot of the barriers to ownership. You need to do more to, you know, help help bank loans, to get to get people. You know, I mean it's it's improvement. That's a lot easier to get a bank loan to start a Burra if you're if you're a white guy. You know so, I mean, it's there's just there's so many layers and so many like root causes that need to be looked at to diversify this and make it make it stronger and make it better. And I think a lot of those conversations are taking place and I think a lot of that introspection that needs to take place is happening. Hopefully. Actually, let's say we win the great will Cleveland himself right here on grill this. Thanks so much. Well, thirty years of robots. We are celebrating that today. I think. I think general was a fantastic person. General is amazing. I mean he's he's the Father Roger. Father's exactly exact as. So I'm sure I'll bumpete again at the beer of any of the festivals here. For sure. I will. Nk Up, will link up. Yeah, I'm not worried. It's gonna be fun. All Right, the great will Cleveland's to girl this. We will be right back. Hey, welcome to grill this, guess. So we're with the Great John or a lab from roar box. We're here helping him celebrate thirty years. John, thank you, by the way, for having us. And this is fantastic. Is this the place where it all started? It is. It feels great to be back, but ninety one we opened in the German house in the South Wedge, so feels great to be back. We're setting this site up today and I can't tell you how it felt to be back. It's great and it's great to see a lot of old customers and a lot of the staff that worked was for a long time that are all back. So it's good. It's an honor to have you guys here. Actually, thanks so much. We were talking to will Cleveland earlier and we we just noticed that, as far as like festivals go, the very first us like remember going to is yours, and I mind what I went was like the early I think will went the first one like ninety something. So now only are you the godfather of Beers, I think you're a godfather of beer festivals in Rochester. Man, I don't God father sounds like I'm old maybe and you guys are young. Two thousand all the good ones. Just kidding, you know, we went to the flower city brewfest. Is that the right name? Did I get it right that time? And there were, I don't know, eighty sixty other craft breweries are along with roar box and that's just a great testimony to the fact that you are looked up at as the, I don't know, like Matt Says, the Godfather of craft brew here, and everybody measures their benchmark on what roar box is doing. Is I think that's a big compliment. No, thank you very much. I don't know. We we love doing that festival. We have from the beginning and we've always really focused on making sure that it's an event that the brewers want to be at, because you're going to go to a festival, we want to talk to the guys that are making the beer and stuff, and Rochester public market is like almost built for a tasting event like that. So we're lucky in a lot of ways, but we just keep it going and hopefully people will continue to show up. Well, there's a thing every craft brewer that I talk to you that's local, if I mentioned your name, but like Oh, he's a great guy, he's influenced, he's given US advice, he's now only, and this is why I'm so impressed. Not only are you a person who is a founder and a starter and creator, you're also helpful. You help other people who are trying to get started and and find their path in this this industry. How's it like you feel be appreciative by so many other craft brewers are doing this? It's great, if it were true. I think I got them all full. Actually, no, I'm only getting it's great and it's easy. You know, that's the beauty of our industry is that it's kind of, I wouldn't say against anybody's competitive industry, but it's kind of all of us little guys against the big guys. You want to convince people we make great beer, were part of the community and we do...

...all the good things. We support you know, we got great staff that are passionate about what they do and that's really what it's all about. So it's in a way it's easy. You just got to let you know, got to hire the right people and do it and we've been very, very lucky with all our customers and it does feel really good to know along the way you've helped some others out. You know, Matt and I love taking grill this on the road and going to visit people and so forth, and a lot of the breweries we visit have food trucks and, you know, all kinds of stuff. But at Rowbox you have a wonderful kitchen staff and a great chef. I mean the food we had at row box was second and one. It was excellent. Well, thank you. I hope you tried a little bit of tonight too, because chef Brian worked really, really hard today to do it. But you know, it's all about it really honestly craft beer, and that's why I love your show. Two guys. You know I mean food is a pretty we're all pretty passionate about food, but craft beer different than the domestic beers. I mean people love the domestic beers. That's fine, to each his own, but craft beer stands up to really good food and and we're just as passionate about food as we are about the beer that goes along with it. Now another question. When ask you, I've gone. Luckily, I've been been able to go to some of the other festivals in your statecraft US Association. They do a few of your festivals and I went there for a few of them. Everyone even were, whether they're I'm in buffalo and Syracuse. They know who you are, they know your beer, they know your product. You I know that you're based here and this is where you're home, in your market is, but people are around New York state and know who you are and respect your craft. I think, I think that's that speaks highly of how well you've been you let this longevity, but how well you do what you do. That's that's my hiring skills, because it's really it's the brewers that do it honestly, and I I love it. I love being involved in in you know, it's great too. I am an old guy, been doing this a while, but I surround myself with young people that are passionate about what they do and they do. I say they because I'm not in there every day making the beer. I'm involved in it, but I'm not making the beer. They do a great job and really, at the end of the day, marketing's really important, but it's about what's in the CAN. Right. Absolutely pretty good job. Absolutely. Hey, we know you're busy and we'll let you go. Thanks for taking the time out of your schedule to visit with us on girl as we appreciate it. John or a lot from raw bocks celebrating thirty years. Thank you, sir. Thanks a lot of guys. Cheers. Thanks for being here. Let you say much. Hey, let's stepple some Moret robbocks beer. We right back on grill this him. We are snacking and drinking right now. I'm telling you, the spread that we have here is amazing. The foods good, the beers good. We have bought. That's our that we're looking for. We we're having it right now. Yeah, we are. It's an unbelievable sour from rower bocks. We're here helping them celebrate thirty years. We're also diving into a park tenderlin and that is awesome. That's why I can't talk. I have to eat now. Now. You were you were saying, which is very accurate, the the robocks obviously known for great beer, but the chefs here put on some amazing displays of food knowledge in the food preparations. It's fantastic. Not to knock any other brewery that has a food truck, because we love Lobster, all absolutely love it all right, but when you go to a roar box you're getting some of the finest food on the planet. I remember when we did our whole grill list from Roor box out on Buffalo Road, we were served the salmon dinner with corn on the column that was deep fried. was you and I were just looking at each other like where did this food come from? Oh my God, dumb food at war box is awesome. Now I think what Ima. Take a sip off talking. That's so good and that's that's the thing. This is the grill this podcast. So we like to combine food and beverage and I think they do that fantastical here. I do too, and it's no matter what your taste is in beer,...

...they have it covered here. Space Kitty, I mean common anybody that loves IPA. Space Kitty is one of the most popular IPA's on the planet. I got some of my fridge right now. And and of course Scotch Ail, the signature beer, I think, and Scotch ail was probably the first beer I had at roar box and I've loved it ever since. It's just awesome in the you know, I'm grilled this. We try all kinds of new things and every time you go to roar box are just chance that there's some new beer you gotta try. Yeah, that's great. I like that because they because they're they're one of the first. You think maybe they'll get stagnant and they'll, you know, become nonrollant because everyone else is doing so much other things, but they're they keep it fresh. They keep doing new stuff. They they have new food, they have new drinks. They are never old. They keep the continue to go with them, with the flow with everybody else. We heard John earlier talk about all the young Calonie has and the people that are the younger generation is so passionate about craft brewers. You go to any college town and the craft breweries are packed and and you know he's right. It's the hiring them, you know. I mean there it takes a real mentor to guide to thing, but but you get some people that are really diving right into learning how to make Craft Beers and there's no limit to your imagination. I mean from Raspberry to currents to elderberr's, you know, I mean you can make a craft beer out of it. And that's what makes row box pretty cool, as they are right on the cutting edge. I agree. You know, there's a lot of craft breweries that we both love. There's something that that are fantastic and make some of our favorite beers. I think there's a different level of respect, though, when it comes to robots. I think everyone is trying to be the best they can be, but everyone respects the fact that robot is kind of the foundation of how it all started. Now how I explain that, and and I don't I don't mean it maliciously to any know me. I don't about them. It's the difference between youth and maturity, right. I mean that's true. That's what it is, and you know, you you a lot of the more successful, younger generation of craft breweries are just shooting from the help and they get it. They get it. I mean, you know, we've had some of the best craft brewers on the planet, especially to sours. Creativity is just awesome in the craft grew business right now. So now now we're into we're in the fall and winter and we switch over to stouts, but next spring you and I are going to jump on that Sour bandwagon like crazy. I agree. You know, the funny thing, I'm glad you mention that because I was kind of already a sour span and you weren't really a sour span at all and the last, I don't know, four or five months that we've been doing our podcast, we've had some of the best sours on the planet. Probably it's the whole fruited sour thing. I mean you can take any fruit that you didn't even know you liked and make an awesome sour out of it. I mean, come on, you know it's great. This, this is great. All right. We're gonna FINISH OUR SANDWICH here and our Jim ryfishing sandwich. I'm going to finish my sandwich here. Mine's gone. Matt, I'm talking to operating buds too much. This is this is the girl. Get this podcast, Jim we're going to find us. They can find us at Iheart, which is the flagship place to get podcasts in the world, basically apple sounder. I don't know, I'm probably forgetting a few, but wherever you get your podcast. That's right, and don't forget. We'll pluck a couple of things before I go to the salmon ratch COBBIC cooking show. That's all right now on Youtube. The second ones almost done, by the way. Almost done. Oh you episode two. He and if you haven't watched episode one, go to Youtube...

...and check out the salmon ranch cowboy cooking show for the laugh of your life. Episode two. Come along here soon. We always have fun making those. We eat well, we drink well there too. So fantastis took those out and get like Jim set wherever you get your podcast grill this is there. All right, we'll get the turn. Take a break so we can eat our food and your beers with the right back. This is the grill list podcast. All right, we're back at grill this we're at the old German house downtown Rochester Helping John Herlab and his great staff celebrate thirty years as Rochester's first craft brewery, and we have a special guest with us. Go ahead and Matthew. All right, so he's the owner of Marshall's street bar and also a few other ones, and he looks like he enjoys graft here. Sir, what's your name, Don Bush, Don thank you for joining us. Make you for taking your time out of enjoying your beer to talk to us. So the first question I want to ask you is eleven bars originally just serve like to biscuit at Beers. Right a lot of Budwise, there's a lot of cores, whatever, all that stuff, but the craft beer explosion has happened. I think most be bars pretty much have to carry him. Now what's your thought on having Correft Beers at boss? Well, I mean I think anything that's innovative is going to be a good thing, whether people like it or not, you know. I mean they're going to be beers that people make that are a hit and some beers that are not going to be a hit. But if you're going to try new things, I think that's the important thing, because you can make a beer. Everybody knows how to make a beer. You know, I mean not everybody, but you know what I'm saying. Everybody knows how to make a beer. But to try new things, it's always going to be a good it's good. It's good with food, it's good with beer. I mean wine makers are always trying new things. Alcohol, you know, distillers are always trying new things. But there's there's no reason to not try to progress. So as a bar owner, so how do you work this? You maybe try a guest tap and if it works, you get it again. Or very much that. Yeah, Yep, I mean, obviously I taste it, I see if I like it, and if I like it, then I can sell it because, you know, I mean there's a certain degree of being able to sell anything. But also if you can actually back it up with with like a passion, you're going to sell more of it. That's always going to be the way to go. So question for you. What did you start liking craft your yourself? What would you decide? You know, the sus she pretty decent. Well, I mean I started pretty much like everybody else. I started with anchor steam, you know, and and then and then I had you know, not that, not that people really consider Guinness necessarily a craft beer, but it but it's. But it's not. It's different. Ado Wiser exactly. It's different. You know, for years, I mean I grew up when peels was a beer and may still be a beer, I'm not sure, you know, but you would drink it and you would just drink it because it was what was available, you know, and and then you would try a new thing, you know. You know, it's in life. I got older and somebody said Hey, here's something you haven't tried. You try it, you know, and that's a so that probably, honestly, maybe maybe thirty years ago, maybe maybe even less, maybe twenty years ago, was the first time I had anything that was even remotely not a domestic type of beer. Yeah, so how did you make out during this mass? Were in this whole covid thing? I mean were you? You were shut down, I assume, for a certain prayer to time for a lot of it. Yep, fortunately, I have a very smart wife who is very good with paperwork, who basically kept it together for us and you know, you know and and like everybody else, it was a struggle, but we're getting back, you know, getting...

...back on track and it's good, great going to Jim's Quesh. I think socialization is important. A lot of people lost that during that. I think to a to a certain degree, it's kind of back right now where people are beginning to get back out socialized and the fact that we're still running up through your anniversary of the craft beer. I think beer is the ultimate social water. What were thought process that? Yeah, definitely, I think I think beer, I mean any kind of alcohol. You know, it's a great equalizer. It makes us all feel a little bit better and you know, as an and it also is it's a commonality. You know, it doesn't matter where you're from. Most people, most people, not all people, but most people, like alcohol and you have a little bit of alcohol with friends or with strangers. I mean there's a lot of people here tonight that I don't know that I'm drinking with. So, you know, there's nothing wrong with that. One thing I learned in my life you never trust anybody that doesn't drink. No, I'm just I'm just kidding you. But all right, so is a Bart you serve food at your bars, right. So how's that price that checking wings working out for you? Oh that, oh, that's pretty great. You know, I it doesn't cost me very much because I more or less just stop selling them. Just you, just because you know. I mean it's always been a loss leader in the first place, and now and now it's even more so. You know. Now it's like, you know, one person turns away says, Oh, this order wasn't quite right. You're now in a deficit. You know what I mean. So you know, it sucks. It's sex for everybody, but you know, and so right now we're doing a lot of boneless wings. So when, when Matt and I were standing here deciding who we were going to interview next. I saw you walking across and I said there's a genius right there, right, all right. You know, I got to give you credit for the whole chicken wing thing, because the supply chains all mess stop. What do you hear about it getting any better anytime soon? Not at all, I've heard. I have heard nothing about it getting better, which is one of the reasons why I feel confident in the you know what, let's just pause until something happens. And you know, it's a lot like gas prices. You know, they fluctuate every year, they fluctuate during during different parts of the economy. You know, they're always they're always ready to go higher. They're not always ready to go lower. So I mean it. My personal opinion is I don't I think that once the once the chicken wholesalers are going to see well, people boughtom anyways. There the price is not going to go down soon. I agree with that, you know, and I remember when it was like, you know, ten cents of head turns that we remember those guys. So, going off a Jim's point, one thing that I do appreciate what craft beer is number one locally. We have a lot of great craft brewers. So even though the supply chain is like all checked up right now, craft beer still relatively not that difficult to get because it's right here right yeah, the prices really have not fluctuated that much. I mean, I don't feel like the craft beer praises have changed any more than they normally do, like every year they go up a little bit. and honestly, I mean I'm buying a keg of beer for more or less the same, you know, within ten dollars. You know, they're like, oh, the prices went up. I'm like how much? Like ten bucks. I'm like, Oh, well, that's really manageable considering the fifty percent rays of something like chicken, you know. So it's like, you know, I think it's great. I think it's great. I think that it would, I would have really hurt the industry a lot if it if it didn't go that way, and I'm glad that a lot of the companies don't feel that they have to go that leg. You know, we're raising it to exorbitant prices. I think that's great. I can't tell you how happy we are that you took the time out of your schedule to visit with us and because I have a memory that only last thirty seconds, what was your name? I'm Don Bush and Yep, and the is my wife, Kelly Bush. John and Kelly. One last question and we'll let everyone get back to their beer to can, because that's what we're...

...here for. See enjoy the peers of the food. The fact that we're here at the German House celebrating thirty years of rower box, one of the original craft brewers and rockster. How important do you think roar box this in this community? Oh, like, that's there's no there's no way to gage that. Like it's there was about a hundred and forty two craft brewers in New York state. Today there's Ninezero. They're still here thirty years later. Yeah, if I mean, you know, that's like. That's like if somebody came out with a new water you know, everybody needs it, and if you did something innovative. I mean they there's no way to measure that. I mean it's absol a hundred percent, like I guess I could just say a hundred percent right. Box has been here forever and they'll always be. Well, MR and Missus Bush, we certainly appreciate you both joining us today. Jim Samono, here grill this. Remember you catch u some. Iheartcom spotify, Apple. Where we get your podcast? Hey, puple, we get support beers. Absolutely sounds great to me. This is grill this. Hey, welcome back. We're at the thirty anniversary of Ruar box brewing here down at the original location where they began in one thousand nine hundred and ninety one at the German House. We're herewood Brian ARLISS had chef, and welcome Brian. Thank you very much for having me now, Brian. What I want to talk about very quickly is pairing of food and beverage is extremely important. You guys do some awesome food here. What's your thought process and how do you come up with some of the food that's you guys do? So I've always been a big fan of just doing the simple things correctly. You know, I've I never want to try and overdo anything and kind of lose sight of my vision. So it's just kind of honing in on what I'm really naturally best at, what I personally enjoy, and therefore it kind of just develops on its own. So it like I say keep the simple things simple, doing well and execute them well. So, Brian, I was just wondering how you got to be a chef and where you got trained. Where'd you go to school? COLBAL scale or whatever? I mean, where'd you go? So I actually started off at the Tabella's on eastaff before they remodeled, and from there I just kind of kept going and started to slowly develop a love for food and one day I just up and decided to go to the Culinaryan stude of America. I had already had plenty of previous restaurant experience, so I was accepted into their advanced culinary experience group and did two years there. Great got my degree. It was a life changing opportunity for me, and then came back home to kind of just showcase my talents with everybody. Xlos it. So, Qution, what ask you is, when you are making food at a craft beer place, does pairing of food and beer coming to play when you make your food? Oh, one hundred percent. As a lover of all the finest beers, dood for you, sir, I genuinely try and find a look bunch of keynotes and many different beverages very specifically with the different beers that we use and kind of just get my mind on those ingredients and then kind of see where that can take me. And you know, I can just branch off a million different directions, going million different cuisines with some of these ingredients. So it's honestly been a credible experience for me and I'm very excited to start rolling out some pairing mony soon. Excellos, you know, it's a you go to a lot of bars or restaurants are craft Brewisian and there's the normal fair there check on wings burghers and whatever. So we walk in here tonight to the German House and we are treated to potato dumplings and a wonderful pork tenderloin. Me that that food's excellent. Now, where'd you come up with that? You just you wake up in the middle of the night and say this is what I'm doing,...

...or or do you have a cookbook you go do? No, honestly, I sit around think about food literally seven and now some you know, sometimes I hate to be Cliche, but these things just pop into my head and then it kind of it's a snowball effects so, yeah, I want to do this little pork loin slider. Okay, what other things can I do to it? What can I add to it? What depth of flavors can I add to it? How will a pair of what the beer? You know, I just and then I think back in my head. You know, what amazing staple pantry items do I have laying around? Because maybe I ferment it to black garlic last week. I want to use that. Maybe I have some pickled onions laying around and I want to use that. You know, I have a lot of little side projects and passion projects I like to play with. So it just kind of builds up this giant repertoire of kind of like a very nice culinary pantry. That's that's awesome. I want to stay I want to stay on Jim's point here. A lot of craft brewers they focus on the beer, which is great. Obviously we all love kraft beer, but they'll end nothing against anybody else. But you know, there's a lot of food trucks or whatever to like that out there and those are great to get like a slider or something cool, like Jim. Jim said earlier, when you little robox you can get a quality meal with your beer. Is that something. If you want to EPP, are you purposely avoiding at the cliche foods that go up beer? Are you trying to do something special? Yes and no. I think it's I think it's important to hit on the important things, such as your pretzels and your wings and your burgers and your pizzas. These are all very important things and there's a reason why they have staying power. But what else can we do? You know, maybe I want to grab some honey that my sister owns the bees for and maybe I want to ferment that. Maybe I have some chilies to make hot honey for that, or I'm, like I said, fermenting garlic and all these other little nuances and just things I have laying around, and that's what really helps me kind of come up with these menus and just take everything a little step further, and hopefully the diners are able to recognize things like that. Okay, yeah, there's something else there. I don't know what it is. I can't put my finger on it, but this is this is really good and I love it. You know, you watch those chefs on TV and they can cut up an onion in ten seconds. I could never figure that out. I mean it's nuts. How do you do that? I mean just practice over and over and over again. Right, yeah, I mean if you're cutting up ten, twenty, thirty pounds a day, you're going to get fast at it. Now I have to ask you this because we have, of course, are celebrating thirty years of roar box craft beer. Jowler Lob, who's doing as the Godfather or craft beer around here. What is your favorite craft beer? What or not? Let me make it easier for you. What's style of beard you prefer the most? I'm honestly a lighter German style. So Your Marsin's, Your Hellas your although, as far as it dunkle or something, but I'm very, very German with my beers and a little bit lighter. And it's funny you say that because one of my first beers I ever had was the Scotch Ail, as with most people, but I fell in love with it and that beer to me is just that's that's my pinnacle for Scotch ails. That's Brian our list, one of the head chefs here at Ruar box. Thank you so much for taking some time out of your schedule to visit with us. Grill this. You can get us on, Iheart, spotify, apple, wherever you get your podcast. Thank you, Brian. Thank you very much for having me. This is girl this we're going to sample some more beers some of the fantastic food from Brian. Be Right back. Hey, welcome back to grill less. Where at row box? No, actually where? At a German House and celebrating the thirty anniversary of robox brewing. It's this is...

...where it all started, back in one thousand nine hundred and ninety one. Yes, so I guess you were right the first time. This is kind of robox because it kind of kind of where it was. Speaking of our box, we have one of the robots folks here, but then Bruce, who I have seen a hundred million times at one of the craft breweries, or not brewers, but bars right down the street called top bellot. Bruce, how are you today, sir? Great to be here. Oh good, good to see you. So we'RE CELEBRATING THIRTY YEARS OF ROW box. One of the very first craft beers that we over have heavy was from robocks. What's your thought on the importance of Roboxs of the craft your community, Roboca, is one of the first Craft Beers I've ever had. It was right downstairs at the the original robos. I was homebrewing for a while and when robock opened I actually stopped homebrewing because they made professionally what I was trying to make in my basement and they made it a lot better. Excellent, excellent. Well, yeah, no homebrewing. That's great, though. What what did you make? What kind did you make? Oh, I tried to emulate what was going on back in the early ninety there porters pilsner's stuff that you really wouldn't find in the states at the time. Yeah, so what the factually, how good? I'm glad you look to that. So, as far as craft beer goes, not. Obviously the spectrum has grown right. There's so many different kind of craft beers out right now. What was the kind of craft beer that kind of brought you into the whole world or craft beer? It was the well, my experience after high school I went to Europe for a month. I got all kinds of beer there that I could not get here. So that's what inspired me to homebrew. Came back, started homebrewing and I actually I eventually got a job at robock because I homebrewed in I started a robock in ninety eight. Wow, that's awesome. Yeah, and this is my third time around with the Roor box. So I've I've worked there three times and this is but I'm happy to be back. A lot of scenes have changed and they've really over thirty years, have put Rochester on the map. One of the pioneers of putting Rochester in the map for craft brewing. Absolutely. So what do you what do you do here our box? What I work at the Buffal area, the Railroad Street facility. I'm producing the beer, I'm brewing the beer, or at railroad street. That's that's amazing. Now, I was just thought you were speaking about roar box of history, war box and the thirty years presidents that that's had here and the fact that when you go to any other brewery, if they talk to any other craft brewery, they know Robox, they know John Herlaw, they respect general lap no matter what they're doing, even even if they're going in a complete different direction. The fact that he's so influential and this this place, so influential with to other craft breweries. What does that how's it make you feel to be part of that an organization like that again. It's great to be back. I started back with Rubach in August of this year. Over the pandemic and it fall out of all that. It's really hard to find employees and I started a consulting a brewery consulting company in two thousand and twenty, January, two thousand and twenty, and we know what happened after that, which and I opened up a couple breweries in the meantime and I finished up a spot in Geneva Arden Brewery Arden, and I was kind of taking a nice little hiatus after finishing that project up and John called me. They needed help, so I sign me up. You...

...know, we've talked about this a long time. You and I need to open a craft brewery. This guy right here could help us out. Now I'm really good at drinking the beer. That not that not the making. That the making process. So's that's right, right, all right. So now here comes a tough question, and I know this is a tough question for people who make beer. What's your favorite kind of beer? Not Not not particular manufactured company, but the actual style of beer. What's your favorite kind of you you know what I'm I'm turned around to a logger guy. Give me a pilsner Munich style. Hell us, all day, easy, drinking something that's not, yeah, over the top hoop, not over the top alcohol, something you can drink all day. Yeah, all day drink of Beers. I totally get that. Yeah, we like nine point five S. don't wait, come on, this is grill this. Come on, that's true. It on your day is well. Last question as far as craft beer in New York state and how how much it's grown and how how big it is, and we were talking earlier about like the supply chain for food and something like that kind of being rough, but the fact that we make craft beer here locally hasn't really hurt the supply chain. Do you think that the craft beer could be the I wants it a savior, but can be still the lynchpin that holds socialization together together? When you're out in the Rochester in the area here, I think beer will still be the social drink of moderation, so to speak. There it is a there are struggles in the supply chain for craft brewers. Ingredients supplies are going up and supply chains are stressed. So it's not been isolated from that issue and things are starting to level out and we haven't really had to see a lot of price increases. Hopefully we won't have to see a lot of price increases going down the road, but honestly it'll probably be in line with the the price of goods of any other product you're buying on grill list. We do nothing in moderation, ever, ever, ever, right, that's true. We eat a drink and about the full amounts. Well, thank you so much for number one. See. Yeah, great to see you, Matt, and enjoyed the problem. To Keep Joining Beers. Enjoy the beers. Yeah, this is grilled. This Jim Salmon, Matt Wilson. Yeah, we're gone. It's real. This.

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