Grill This!
Grill This!

Episode 44 · 3 months ago

NYSBA Festival at the Belmont Park Racetrack

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Jim and Matt take Grill This on the road for the New York Craft Brewers Festival - LONG ISLAND at the Belmont Park Racetrack. Over 50 NYS breweries pour beers to sample while world-class horse racing takes place from the 4th floor of the Grandstand! Jim and Matt speak with some of the the brewers, organizers, and event planners.

It's it's time to take your grilling skills to the next level. We will take you from grilled disaster to grill master. So grab your tongue, your aprons and your pink glasses. Get ready to grill this with Matt Wilson and Jim Salmon. Hi, everybody, welcome to grill this Jim Sammon, along with the Great Matthew t Wilson and the tea stands for going to Belmont race track with the hood, The New York State Brewers Association, where we are right now. They have over fifty five craft breweries here and some great food and and a wonderful, wonderful crowd packing in here as we walk into to the festival, which is now in person. And the last couple of years they had a tough time with the you know, the covid and all the restrictions and whatever, and Matt and I were at their first festival that was open in real life to people in Albany here a couple of months ago, and now this wonderful festival here in Queens New York at the Balmont race track. This is fantastic. So hipple, are sitting here waiting for the FESSEL TO START and we're watching the race track and this is amazing. It's a really big track. It's a big national thing, Jim, it's televised. It's a beautiful scene and it's nice to be here in New York City Long Island to be exact, to watch this and get excited to go ahead and try all these craft beers at the New York State Craft Bros Association. You know, Matthew, when I think about all the money that's here and and all the billion dollar horses that have been here over the over the last hundred years at Belmont racetrackets, stunning, right. And we get to go into the clubhouse and check out all these great local craft breweries and and some of them are from here and you know, New York City, Long Island or whatever, but there's some here from all across the state. Just like you and I came from Rochester all the way to do grill this, you know, live in person here at this great festival. It's fact. That's the fact that we continue to keep they have the opportunity to do these on the road is amazing. We want to think Paul Leone, the Executive Director of the New York State Brews Association for allowing us to be here and participate. And, Jim, could this is a nice day. Sixty degrees, the sons out, the horses are racing, there's beers being poured and we're here interviewing brewers and talking about craft beer. All right, let's recap this a little bit. The weather's perfect, absolutely perfect. We're going to dive into some of the finest craft brews in New York state, which means in the world life is great here in the United States of America. Absolutely all right, Jim, I say we get started. So let's go ahead. I know we're sitting here and relaxing, but because I'm going to get up and walk around and trusting these Craft Beers. What do you say? I think it's a win. Grill List, folks, you don't want to miss one minute or one episode of Grill lists available on, Iheart, spotify, apple, wherever you get your punk, pound cast, wherever you get your podcast, grill this stay with us. Hey, Jim Sammon and Matt Wilson here and we are at resurgence here at the Belmont Crap your festival and we're trying a fruited Sur now, listen name of this fruit, saw its fruited. Ours called on the tea, on the tea. And who are we speaking with? My name is brandon. I'm the head canning Lee, a resurgence brewer. This is piers, he's he's a cell you know, you guys. We have been doing this podcast for two years and we've got I don't know how many, a hundred of them out there, and we have reviewed and tasted so many resurgence beers there. It's a wonderful beer that you do.

Thank you very much. We appreciate that. So how tell me how you guys got started? What do you how long you been at resurgence? Firstly, I've been a resurgence for about two years. I started because I started going to school for Brewing and then I got let go from the job I was working at at the time because they said we're not working around your school schedule. So I contacted are the owners of resurgence, and said Hey, I need a job. They said come on in and start tomorrow. Go. So what do you do a resurgence and tell your name. Hi, I'm here's cockering. I'm a SELLERMAN A resurgence. So, because we not everybody will know what that is. Explain exactly what you do. Basically everything but brew. I'd take care of the beer. Okay, all right, so your the you take care of of Thatch and clean stuff and make sure everything's ready to go. And you yeah, I mean that's like we're talking to the guy that's the most important, right. Yes, yeah, a man of many words. Are you all right? So, so, how big is resurgence and where are you located and how many different types of beer do you have? So we're actually located in Buffalo, New York, right onto the river, right on Chicago Street. We are an actual thirty barrel brew system. I believe last year we did thousand, nine thousand barrels of beer and we did seventy different styles of fit. Well, I should say seventy different beers, not seventy different styles, but yeah, seventy different beers last year. All right, Cuz because we asked a tough questions here, right, Matt, absolutely do. which beer do you make? Do you like the bout? My personal favorite is sit mo. It's our sit CITRUM MOSAIC IPA. It's our New England. It's got a nice dry finish to it, so it's just easy drinking on a good day. My personal favorite as heaving the clouds. It's one of our double IPAs we made does in America, great place. Come on, we're here with a guys from resurgence. Matt, you have any questions? Yeah, I got a couple. So, as far as resources brewing, how long have you been doing this and what got you in to brewing? Crap your well, you're like a homebrew or that kind of expanded. I know a lot of people who do this start out in their basement or their garage and they made their own thing. And we'll follow up question of that is. What got you into craft? You're what transitions you from industrialized beer over to craft geer? Well, resurgence itself got started by our president, Jeff whare. He was a homebrewer to start and then he went and worked for Sam Adams for a little while and decided to come back and he wanted a resurgence buffalo and said, you know, I can do this, so he started his own place. I believe US two thousand and fourteen. Yeah, it two thousand and fourteen. So we started with a fifteen barrel brew system there and then moved to our new location, which is about three times the size, and transferred up to the thirty barrel. Personally, I homebrewed on and off for about ten years, started moving around, got into retail business, lost out of it and then decided one day my wife gave me a kick in the ashes like go back to school, you want to brew beer, just do it. Yeah, that's a good call, I'm doing it. So that's how I started. Yeah, yeah, the wife feel hi, you know, it's hi. Yeah, the wife also. You know, it's funny, how how many times our wives, because give a kissing the asses, do the right thing. So exactly. Oh, it always works to done. All right. So what I'm sampling right now, and by the way, where Belmont Racetrack here? This is grills Matt and Jim and we're here at resurgence and this is the New York State Brewers Association Festival in person too, which is really cool. And I'm sampling on the Chee. It's an iced tea lemonade sour, and I gotta tell you, it's awesome. It's absolutely you guys hit this one out of the park. Thank you, guys. We appreciate that. All right. Number two, how do we get those great shirts that belong in Canada. That's says the resurgence Brownie coming, you know. That's that's the mounted police. Where that right? It's wonderful, isn't...

...so? Yeah, there you go. All right. Well, well, thank you, guys. We appreciate it. Thank you, guys who here. Appreciate it. All right, grill less. Matt Jim will be back with another addition, a grill list, right here at the festival at now Mont race tracks. Hey, Matt Jim, back here at the Belmont Race Trek toing our our podcast. This has been a great festival so far. We're here at frequentum. I'm talking to David. He's the one of the brewers here. DEBREWER here, probably. David. How you doing today, sir? I'm doing really well. How about you? I'm doing very well. Now. We stopped over because the person who does our photography for our podcast and also have to be my wife, said that this is some of the best beer she's tasted. So she made Jim come over here. He came overstaid some of the bester heat tasted. So I came over here, some of the US do. I tasted. He's some great stuff. You guys going out of here. So I'm looking at what you got on the table. You got a just fruit sour ill, a national natural flavors, our Ip with tender, which I'm drink, which is delicious, and Jim just had the cheery brandy barrel. How do you come up with these concepts? Basically, we look at things that we want to drink ultimately and we like to put our own spin on things. So something in western New York that's trending is the smoothie SOT ours, right. So that's why we really came up with a just fruit series. That's our take on smoothie sours. So people call them pastry sours, but we don't use lactose in any of our beer, so we use the fruit to make it thick. Hence the name just fruit. The natural flavors is just basically MIMOSA inspired sour IPA. Now, so another question I have. What you I know your you have some questions too, but these flavor profiles are spectacular. Is this? Is this kind of like your staple of what you do, or do you have a beer that's like war traditional, or how do you, how do you guys approach Beureaud are you guys all over the board? Yeah, so we're really everything. We love beer in general. So, as you can see, we actually have a my box with us also, so we have love loggers. I think most brewers will tell you they love loggers. So we actually have horizontal loggering takes. So we're always trying to keep at least a couple of loggers on draft. Some of the new trendier stuff like the just fruits and this sour IPAs and then some New England IPAs. In January we do a stout month in Canadago that I organized, where all the breweries really put out stouts and we do a punch card system, so if you go and you have a stout at every brewery, at the last one, you can turn that in for a commemorative glass, because we're really trying to promote community down there, because I think that's what beer should be. People love to try beer from everywhere, so might as well make a community out of absolutely. Well, first of all, where is your brewery located? Where can people find it? We're on in Cannadegua, right on Main Street, so are in downtown Canadegua, just north of the lake. If you're heading down south to head towards the lake, will be on your right hand side. It's the old burn dairy building. If anybody's familiar with that, we know it well. That's so over the past couple years Matt and I have in the studio we do our grill as podcasts and we judge and rate fruited sours and we've got a they seem to have come on like really crazy in the last few years and we love them. And it seems like there's a difference between a regular old sour and a heavy fruited sour. We it's okay, but then we love it and you get you've got a fruited Sour Ale strawberry, mangle passion fruit, which is really awesome. So and I know there's a big price difference between, you know, kind of institutional sour and a heavy fruited sour. What's that all about? Ultimately it comes down to fruit. So the adjuncts are expensive. So the price difference on a heavily fruited sour is going to be significantly more money because it's significantly more fruit. So that's really where that price difference comes from. The more traditional sours, I wouldn't that they're quite as expensive because typically, if there's going to be...

...fruit, it's going to be a significantly less fruit. Maybe some more time might go into those, but from a price point really fruit is expensive. There's a lot of craft breweries and and even some of the bigger names that are making some like kbs and whatever, that are making some awesome bourbon barrel aged bruce and and some of the Times there's people waiting outside in lines to get these limited edition type things. Now you have a Cherry Brandy Barrel Age Vanilla Almond Imperial Stout. I'm tired, I'm tired out. Just say right. So, what kind of barrels? And how do you do though all of that? Where do you get the barrels and whatever? So actually, in the beer world there's barrel brokers, right, so they're basically middlemen who acquire or purchase barrels from all the big manufacturers. So if you come to our brewery right when you walk in, you'll see we have six barrels sitting there right now which are all imperial stouts. We have a no creeked barrel, about the trays barrel and old elk barrel and a few other barrels and basically we work with a barrel broker and they if we're looking for Bourbon, I try and find the one that I want. I would love to get a Blatin's barrel because I personally love Latins by so I'm on waiting list for one of those, because they were out of them for the year when I called last time. But there's a lot of fun barrel aging going on in the beer world right now. We're also launching another sour series soon that would involve some other types of spirit barrels and I've had some really fantastic like Jin Barrell eight sours lately and it's really cool to see that as another aspect to beer. You know, it's fun for us to come to these festivals and talk to the real people, but of David wanted to send us a case of those powers when he was done. I'm not going to fight that. I've just this. We're doing girl listen the studio once a week. I mean, yeah, he would win right. So, as a brewer and you and you brewill everything and Got Rember, I got two questions for you, but I love brewers. First question is what got you into it? Where were you at home brewing where you drinking like industrial life beer, was saying, what the hell is this and want to switch over to something else? What got you in the craft beer and brewing? Honestly, I've always loved beer. In College, Buddy and I really kind of started getting into craft beer with dog fish heat. I bartended and it was a big thing to get a keg of dog fish ninety minute right at the time, and I was like this is cool, I like this, and then I just kind of graduated into beer and getting really further and further into craft beer, to the point where a bunny and I were drinking at a brewery and got a little drunk and wandered into the home brew store next door and we're like we could try this. So who we bought a kit which was basically two buckets for sixty dollars, the most expensive buckets I've ever purchased, and and we decided we were going to make our own recipes and we are going to start all grain. We weren't going to do any kids. We knew nothing. So I spent about two weeks deep diving into how to make beer and I ended up coming up with a simple recipe for a Pale Ale and we brewed it, put it in a bucket, plastic pocket for a minute. It in the bucket, tagged it. A couple of weeks later he came up to try it and we're like, it's clean, it's good, but it's not special. So yeah, exactly. Sound was like. I really fell in love with brewing because I love the science of it and I love developing recipes and thinking about how the beer is supposed to be and working back where it's to come up with a recipe to make it that way. So I just I love beer. It's funny. I Jem I both have a couple those buckets at our house, so we totally do it. To come from took a quick sick, a pusher, I add for you. As far as making beer right now, what's your favorite kind of beer to make right now? That's that's as I do. That's a tricky one. We...

...love our loggers. We have horizontal loggering tanks because we love loggers so much. So we have a lot of fun with that. We just did our second rice logger, which sounds like it should be just a boring beer, but it's honestly one of the most complex beers we've ever brewed in the on the Brew Day we do a serial mash for whole grain rice and're actually using whole grain rice, not malted rice. So then it's a double mash and it's a very complex, complex day, but we love it. Then it ends up in the loggering tank for four or five weeks and then we love drinking it. So I've been thinking. I've been thinking here for the last few minutes on how I'm going to close this interview out with David and and pronounce the name of the Brewery. But what is it for? Quentum? Say it again for quentum. Hey, buddy. Thank you very much. Yes, David from for Quentin, Matt Wilson, Jim Sammon, we'll be back with more of girl this here at the belmount race track with a run with the I've almost said Rochester. We know it's done, New York State brewers festival. We'll be right back girl vis at the Belmont race track out here. Long on New York, having a fantastic time at the New York State Bruce sociation. Now every time we go to any brue festival we look for Big Alice because we almost always have them on our shows on the road at festivals. And guess what? We found them here again today and we're talking to Dan over a big alas bruined Queen Staff Room. So we've been to the ones. Geneva, Jim now big allis started out in Queen's right. Yes, Sarah did. Don't tell us about that. What when was it and how long you been there and all that cooed job. Yeah, of course. So we're actually coming up on our nine year anniversary this June twelve. We're actually doing an anniversary party over in our queen's location to so if you guys are around, definitely come through. Live music a lot of food. Should be a great day for sure. But initially the name comes from one of the smoke stacks that are nearby over there. So that's where it comes from. A lot of neighborhood love. And with that we go ahead and change the wording around because that smokes. That nickname was big alice. With that we went ahead to change the lettering so it's Big Alice Ali. See, so long island city. Oh yeah, that's always want to make sure our planets safe, for sure. That's great. Your Beers are awesome and that's, you know, on Grill list. Oftentimes, when we're in a studio will have some big alice bruise that were rating and trying and whatever. It's always great. Now, now, what do you do there? Oh, so, currently I'm the TAP room manager for the Queen's location, but I'm going to step down this week. We have a new tap room manager coming in. I just got a different job, but I'll still be tending bar over there once in a while. Our new tapper manager is going to be Stephanie, who's going to absolutely kill it though there. All right, we always like to talk to shark timers to right, I make them on. So what's your what's your favorite big Alice Brew? My favorite big alice beer hands down is the blasket read. It's a Irish Red Ale imperial to be more precise. It is absolutely amazing. Reminds me of the killions but a bit creamier and it just that one just hits right where it's supposed to. All right, so tell us what you're going to do. I mean we're we ask some tough question. So where are you going? I mean, yeah, I'll maybe not specifically, but what are you going to do. I'm switching over to do ad sales with the Walt Disney Company. Can We? How long do we have to talk him out of that now? I mean, I definitely love working for Big Alice, you know, definitely nothing personal, sky a wedding and two dogs that I got to take care of. So it's definitely a big thing. So so you're getting married? Yes, what all, congrudge a little twenty. When are you getting married? Marks Thirty One, two thousand and twenty three. All right. So, because we ask the tougher questions. How much is your wedding reception cost? Oh, that is one pretty penny, for sure. It's not cheap, but it's it's going to be over at Centerport, at water's edge along islands. Now I have a good friend of mine that I don't...

...know. His son's getting married. Was Thirty something years old and they're talking in the Seventyzero Ring Yeah, that's about right. So with music, photography, videos, all that fun stuff, a definitely adds up. And then, you know, of course, like paying for the dress on top of that. You know, it's fun. It's a lot of fun. Now we're visiting with Dan, with Dan and and you obviously live in New York City. That's right, I'm over in a story. All right, so I might drive down here from Rochester. I'm, you know, reading over stuff and talking about the fact that the average rent in New York City is thirty five hundred dollars a month. Yep, about. It's a lot of fun, especially with two dogs. So now our goals to get you to something that's say, something that'll ruin your life. Now we're kidding you though, but Um, so you've been here all your life? Yeah, I'm from Queens originally. Yeah, but what's funny is actually was working up state at our Geneva location last summer from May to early August. Now we yeah, we went and did girl list live from big alice there and and it was so much fun. So are you? One of the things I was so surprised by, as there's so many craft breweries here in New York City. Oh yeah, a hundred percent. I mean we got iconic down the street from us, fifth hammer as well, L see beer project. There's tons nearby and it's just a really great community to be a part up for shure. Well, Dan, you've been very, very kind to let us try and ruin your life. But seriously, we at grills we hope you have a great wedding and a great future, no matter what you're doing, and anybody that gets a chance to stop at Big Alice in New York City or Geneva wins. Right, Matthew, absolutely. I had one more question, cuse I remember this well. We talked to Big Alice in Geneva that they actually take the water from here and use it to make the beer there. Is that actor? Yeah, so what's happening now is they they're messing around with the chemical balance so it matches the same water that we have down here in the city, because honestly, New York City has some of the best water. So why not just keep doing that as the base for the beer? That's the outstanding all right, those my last question. I have to that's what the water because I grant that. Who Does that? Right? Awesome as absolutely you guys have a fantastical Kasan in Jadeva, awesome location. Obviously your original Kation in New York City. You're an amazing member of the craft beer community and we appreciate all you guys that you guys would do. Thank you boys. It's a put pleasure talking to you and I'm always happy to see you, and good luck to Dan, Matt and Jim. Girls will be back with more. Hey, we're at girls, as is Matt and Jim. We're at the BELMA racetrack with the New York State Brewers Association Festival in person. Right, no mask, no covid anymore. Okay, we're here with chloe, who represents a New York State Craft Brewers Association. Thanks for visiting with us. Hey, thank you, guys, for being here. How Fun is this? This is awesome. When we I saw you in Buffalo last time, this is fantastic. By what you're at a race shut they're actually race is going on, there's betting of on the rest is going on and you're raving. An amazing craft brewing event happening. How has everything been for you since now that things are kind of opening back up and we can have in person festivals? How's ween going? Oh my gosh, I can't tell you how great it is to see everybody's smiling faces and be able to just share beer and conversation and have fun together and learn from each other and laugh together. It's been absolutely wonderful and to see the amazing amount of support from all the New York state craft beer enthusiast coming out here and in all the breweries coming out here. We have fifty five plus breweries from all over the stay hand local to the Long Island area, here...

...today to share a beer with enthusiasts. All that support is just it's such a good feeling. You know, you, The New York State Brewers Association, does this right. Every one of these festivals that we've ever been to. You actually visit with the brewers and the owners, which is really cool. People want to ask them questions, they want to talk about how they got started and and all these awesome beers that are here today. Oh Yeah, and I can tell you it'll it'll be pretty amazing what you find the backgrounds of these brewers. Almost none of them said, Hey, I'm gonna, you know, when they're a little I'm going to start a brewery when I grew up. They all come from really amazing backgrounds and stories and it's very cool to learn from them and enjoy their beer and all their knowledge and and never ceases to amaze either matter or I of the various kinds of beers here. I mean you can find anything from cucumber to coconut to fruited sours, to anybody's the only limit is your own imagination. Yes, and that is the coolest thing about beer right. It's a total art form and there are so many different styles. But there's also a lot of styles here. There are great for the introduct like you could be a season beer enthusiast or you could be totally new to beer. So you don't even like beer and you come here, I promise you you'll find something that you like. There's everything. There's something for everyone. So, Oh yeah, I always ask us of everyone who works in this industry. Obviously we all started, probably, I think everyone started, probably drinking like a regular like blood, wise your wor like a cores or whatever it is that if you start get out and then eventually you kind of transition into this craft beer world. How did you transition from like regular, standardized, industrialize beer to this whole unique world of craft beer? So I started in a similar way that I hope money craft beer enthusiasts do, which is there is a small brewery in my town that I grew up in. I grew up there drinking their non alcoholic group Beer and when I turned twenty one I couldn't wait to go and check it out and see what they had. And my gateway beer was a coffee stout and this brewery was cdcraft brewers. They're famous for brewing cage help, a monkey outside of Rochester, New York, and fortunately they're not open anymore. But Yep, the stouts got me into beer and I got a part time job working in the tap room and fell in love with the art, the science, the entrepreneurship, everything behind the beer. And here I am now. You know, one of the cool things for Matt and I is the whole increase in diversity, if you will, and craft brewing, a lot of women, a lot of African American folks coming on board and and doing the whole thing in and again that the only limitation is your own imagination, and it seems like The New York State Brewers Association really really promotes all of that great stuff. Anybody can make beer, absolutely anybody, and everyone should. We hope that everyone feels welcome and we're working really hard as a guild and as an estate to to really invite everybody in, teach everyone about beer, to right we're hoping to do a lot more educational pieces on just introductory to craft beer for the because it can be intimidating all these beer styles and all the different varieties and some people they just need an invitation to come in and learn a little bit about it and then it's just much more digestible and we really hope to keep growing this amazing craft beer community of, you know, welcoming and caring people. Well, there's fifty five, over fifty five craft brewers here at the Belmont race track for the New York State Brewers Association Festival in person and Matt and I have sampled over a hundred and seventy five.

So I look so question for your chloe. So if someone has not had craft beer before, someone's been that person who only drinks the standardize industrialized beers, what would your advice or what you would say to them beats that kind of have them try and come into this environment and give it a shot as far as craft beer goes. Yeah, so I would say honestly, like go into it with an open mind and a really important part about drinking New York state beer is new or seat there specifically brewed with New York state grown ingredients. When you're drinking that beer and it was produced here and all the ingredients came from our economy, you're supporting an entire industry and it's also more sustainable to you know when you were reducing that carbon footprint for delivery within the state. So that's kind of a long answer to that question, but it's one great reason. It's a great reason to Try New York state beer versus some of the big domesticated things, and then also just from like a tasting level, they're like I said, there's so many to try and there's a lot of light pilsners, rice loggers. Those are all right. Now brewers are working hard to make those and, by the way, it takes double the amount of time to brew a logger for Craft Brewery and these small tanks. And they're doing it because they know that people want it and it's a light, approachable beer and they want to invite more people to come and experience everything. Then you can dance up to the other stuff. Well, that's chloe and she's awesome. Right The New York State Brewers Association. We're here Belmom, Park, Matt and Jim for Grillis thank you so much, chloe. Appreciate your participation in grill this. will be back for more. Stay with us. Rubus podcast. We're still here at the Belmont race track for the New York State Brewers Association. Having the fantastic time talking to a bunch of Great Craft Beers. A brewers here and I just stopped by the Fifth Hammer booth him and it's delicious beer here. Look the Chris. Where the brewers here at Fifth Hammer? Chris, how you doing today, sir? I'm fantastic, delighted to be here. Thank you so much so, Chris. First question for you. How long is fifth hammer been around and how that concept developed? If you know so, we opened in two thousand and seventeen. Me and my partner day we started a concept a on two thousand and fifteen. He's a recovering lawyer. I'm a longtime brewer. Yeah, you did. I'm a longtime brewer and and together with my wife, we had a little brewing project called Cusette libations. We had a podcast on fermentation, on heritage trader network and and just like I've evern a long time and it is my life and way of life. But also prebrewing I'm a saxophone player and I'm still a saxop player in music. So so when it comes the Fifth Hammer, fifth hammer as a concept and is his name as a name comes from a story of Pathagoras and and I'm an improvising musician, and so this, this story I heard, kind of really resounded with me anyway. But that grits was walking by a blacksmith. Then he heard this sound and and I went inside there and wanted a way. It sounded so good. These hammers were hammering with on an anvil for hammer sound a beautiful together. The fifth hammer what didn't sound as good, didn't sound like it didn't sound good with the rest of the hammers. are like. So fifth hammer to US represents individuality, like paggers took the fourd and yeah, it stands out until it's like like we're you know, we make our beer and we make what we like to make and we really love the quality of it, but it's not necessarily for everybody, no matter where it is. But it's just like, well, I mean not necessarily for conforming to conventional harmonies. What I'm saying like we make a variety of styles. Were into doing everything where and we're into for creativity and perpetuity and final and seeing whateverever the flavors and the process is can take us, like going to the outer realms of where we can go absolute. You know, I always like to ask everybody how you got started in this. I mean, did you start in a garage like a lot of other guys did? I've been living in New York since the late S, so I never had a garage like that. I'm a sack, I stand, I stand nailed to the wall, but...

I did start in my kitchen and like I can bruin small, small places in New York City. I quickly became part of the New York City homebrew is guilt in two thousand and one and through my peers and brethren through that, through that, through that what the oldest New York City homebrew club in history? Probably there's New York City homebrew is guilt. Garrett Alver was part of the thing and addictually, I think the Steve Hendy found guert all over through the through the homebrew is guilt. One thousand nine hundred and eighty eight, naica area is when the guild started. Then the multi barley appreciation society started after that. But yeah, I started. I learned from my peers there and I never really I was still just like a professional sack spill players. I wasn't really thinking it was going to take over my life in the way that it has. But once I started homebrewing and and meeting all the people I met their homebrew and through the beer scene, like beers, people, baby, so like it, just like it. Thought, well, all this love and the thing I got from it just kind of just you get, got sucked into it in a way that it's like just was not predicted. But I love it. I Love the art of it and to me, just like the backphone, it's like making music, like getting some from concept to glass is the same as concept and melody and put it on my horn. So I'm glad that he shy and a man of few words. No, no, no, seriously, of Fifth Hammer Brewing Company is I'm I'm trying. Which one do I have here? Do you know you are drinking owl theory? That's right, and you'll just feed to the right of you my brewer, Kevin early and basically he's the size of two calens, who's one of my bartenders and, and I say that to say this is how we relate. The amount of coconut that we put into this beer is the amount of by weight of a Kevin. Early. It's awesome. We gotta get him over here in a minute. But so you us up. You personally. What's your favorite beer? I mean, I'm not necessarily what you make a fifth ammor but what do you like the most? Look still. Well, he's like asking me my favorite sac phone players are like what kind of music I like? There there are two kinds of beer. There are two kinds of music, the good kind and the other kind. So my favorite is a good kind. I love that. What what is your signature beer, if you have one? I think right now signature. Not By way, what I would decree my signature, but by the way, like once I start working myself, I realize I'm not working for myself. You guys are the bigot. So most people for the Hammer. I think about fit hammer. They think about our troublesome jellyfish, which is a mosaic and both like a hop IPA. People really like ore cruited so hours. Also, I've formit them in Oak. We have OAK footers over there. Those go really well and but by change fruits on them all the time. But I don't know fit the hammer is we I'm a per myscuous drinker and therefore formscious brewer, and thankfully have an audience that is similar to my taste. Like they come in and they're always trying to the new stuff and you know, it's a lot of work to keep doing new stuff, but that's why I'm in this. Like the moment where we start stamping stuff out at over and over is like one thing. That's not really what I'm in it for, like I'm minute to I mean. I mean it's a testament to a good brewer to be able to make something consistently over and over and like I certainly have done that at brewing job that I've been in the past, and I we will do that occasionally, for when we repeat Beers, you know, and to make them like they were before. It's a greatly missed test for your processes and for the quality and just knowing what you're doing and having a good team. So we dedicate ourselves to being able to do that when we do Repeat Beers. But, Matt and Jim, we're here at the BELMA racetrack with the New York State Brewers Association Festival in person. How cool is this? We're here at Fifth Hammer with Chris. Now, okay, here's the deal. How does New York state treat you as a crap rower? You happy with all that? New State has been pretty damn good, I gotta be honest. Like and I think that's one reason why we are, I think, fourth in the nation by way the how many breweries we have in this state, and not necessarily by capping of it, but we have. We have so many brees. The New York City Brus Association has been incredible for libbying for our interests and helping keep it alive. Our former governor has as an active things like the craft beer act and and also the farm and bury license. That has helped us kind of stay alive...

...and doing things. New York stay. Has Been Very favorable to the bring and I think we have contributed significantly to the economy in this state and and I think it's being recognized all around the board. And so we just all have to talk about all of the issues to make sure that we can all continue functioning like this and make the whole thing grow and bring bring great flavor to the people. All right, one course, and I'll pass this son to Matt because I know he has seventy five other questions. How about the supply chain? What's going on with all that? That's a fascinating place, you know we are this is an agricultural product and so year over year, the the supplies themselves might vary and this year in particular, like Mal thing in America, there's different diastatic power and different efficiencies that were able to get this year. So even if, even with the supply chain issues, and I think you're leading to is like the like, shipping costs have gone up and and being able to deal with everything has gone up, but the ingreeting it itself, with those increased costs, we need more of it in order to get what we need to the extract from it. So we're having to be creative on how to use it. It's I mean, obviously it's the very this is not hard to single down a quick answer for you here. I get it. But the in mind, if I hog this for a minute, boy Gordy, because all right, so you go to your grocery store and some crap brewers have bruise there. Some don't. A fruited sour might be ten bucks four pack and all of a sudden there's one there, just twenty five, and you buy that one. You take him home and you go, Oh my God, that's fruited Sour my dreams. What's the difference there? I mean what what creates quality in a in a fruited sour? This is a subjective answer, because some people really like dry fruited sours. Some people like really, really sweet, fruted sours, some people like really fermented Fred Tours. They like something like about balance, where you can really taste the beers on. People like things that are just like taste, like juice. In order for it to taste a lot like juice or like really, really fruited, you have to use a lot more fruit. So the you know the pounds per barrel on that fruit and how it expresses itself. It's not just bound premarow, but it could be like where in the in the fermentation process you're doing and in order to get it stable, there are a lot of different ways to skin a cat and there are a lot of different cats. You might want to have a scare. Yeah, he took one of my questions, which is don't you good? That was a great question. My other question is one of the things that I'm big on is the whole farm to table thing, right. So I know what's craft beer. A lot of times you incorporate using things from local farmers, local bikeeries to make the yeast and all that stuff. So that way it's kind of a community, community thing, right, everyone's kind of contributing to making this product and everyone's kind of benefiting from that. Do you I do as well? Did you try to get as much local stuff as you can or do you just get what you got to get, because costs, of the way, costs are right. Costs are what they're what they are, and it kind of depends on where outs and where you can really celebrate it. There's I mean. And when we do New York Stay Farm Beers, and we do have we have a dual license, so we're a farm bury and a production bury and in order to keep our farm bury license, we have to do brew x amount per year to make sure we do it or under the farm bury license, of which is sixty percent using all New York state ingredients. But when we do it, we actually tried to do a hundred percent of those ingredients so that where there can action, so that the communication we dress in the farmers and people do it can be a little bit more direct and there can't be any variables in the way. So we try and do that as far as like when it comes to dealing with locally ingredients beyond the malted barley and hops. When it comes to fruit, we would love to accept. We use generally some well, we like some exotic fruits at our grown in New York state. So so to do that and then also it's a lot of work to do to do whole fruit and we are not...

...the biggest facility and we are streamlined in our in our staffing, so we might have not have the time to curate things ourselves or did stem cherries or although I would really like to do that this next season because the New York state makes some really Great Sour Cherries. Yeah, so we like to get there, but we we do as much as we can of it, but obviously it's limited based on where we think outs we can do it and and based on how much we're able to devote to it, based on bandwidth and and what the market is and like we were in a much better place pre pandemic, but at everybody's kind of recovering from that. It's a what we did plan for. We've had to adapt into for the new thing. And so where is Fifth Hammer? Where can people go there? Yeah, via Emmer is. All everything's brewed right right at our on our site in Long Island, city Queens on forty six avenue between eleven and and and Vernon, right down from BSONE, one stop on the train away from Grand Central Station in Manhattan. So we are we are New York City base and we are open every day of the week. I play a music there every Wednesday when the weather is nice. You do yeah, cool, now, there you go. The Guy owns the place or he's had brewer and he plays music. I see no problem with doing that at all. Hey, listen, I appreciate what you do. I think what you do is great and also, like I said, I think supporting local breweries as more important than almost anything when you beer. One more question I want to ask you, because I asked this to almost all brewers. There comes a point in time, I think we all start out drinking. When you first drink, it's industrialized beers right, we all have like a bloodweiser or a corse or whatever. What crossed you over from the Industrialized Beers? It's a craft beer. I had my ad a birthday party in college and I was going to go get a keg of an industrial very like just some macro macar a logger. That would have been fine. We've been great for that party. But my very dear friend Dan Sears, trumpet player that I play with and we are Horn Sexual, called the tone evangelist and he was like I'm not letting you get that. We're getting you some craft, craft beer for this and we got stouts honey porter, okaycause the southside of Porter, for my for my birthday party, and are like Holy Shit, this is is the jet and I we went down the thing and Carol Stout like when she was a stalwarid in the industry and just a wonderful woman, still is, but about the cloth down stops now and I just I've been influenced by that beer and all the doors that opened from there where I really started paying attention to my pilot flavors and how that works with with food and eating local and really I had a girlfriend shortly there after to that the kind of really got me into cooking and and and really diving into that road and at it just been ever look bad, ever look back. Well. Thank you, Chris from visiting with us. We really appreciate it. This is Jim Salmon, Matt Wilson, Matthew t Wilson. Stand the t stands for I have no idea. Terribly Thirsty Grill Groll List podcast here at Fifth Hammer. Will be back stay with us, men, Jim. Thank you so much. Hey, Jim and Matt, here a Grill List podcast. We're here at Bell Mount Racetrack With The New York state bruise associate. It's just in live festival here. We're having a great time today interview and a lot of people. We're here with the folks from heritage he'll brewhouse. How are you? I'm doing great. It's great to meet you guys. All right, what's your name? I'm Dan Palladino. I'm the owner and general manager of the brewery and the farm that it sits on. All right, so now, Dan, you do a lot of things here at Heritage Hill and so tell us about your beers and how you got started in all this. So the the brewery sits in the middle of our family farm, which is a hundred and seventy seven year old farm about fifteen minutes outside of Syracuse, high up in the hills as town called pompy. It's a historic town, really neat and and the reason we call it Heritage Hill. A lot of history and our family on the third generation, with my brother, to own the farm and I decided to build a brewery and a restaurant, you know, using the grains from our farm...

...and the beef from our farm in it to kind of find a way to make the farm sustainable long term. And I found a great brewer and billy over here and it's cranking out great beers. He's won some New York state metals you want to gabf metal and we use, like I said, our beef and beautiful views. You're high up in the hills. You can see eight counties from the from the farm and the brewery. It's just a great spot to be. Now, do you guys grow your own hops to no, no, we don't do hops. I did barley for a period of time, but both of those really require a lot of attention in detail in in order to do that well, you have to really be focused on it. So we focus on the end product. You know, the food, our grains. Obviously we were raising those, but we've been doing those four years and doing it well. But we have supported the new hop breeding program out of Cornell. We help get that established with a bunch of different organizations. So we try to be really active in agriculture. I know you have a sour here and you have some other kinds of beer. What's your signature beer at Hermitage Hill? The funny thing is is that if you come to our place, if people from every walk of life. So we're family friendly. We have animals with kids, we have families, you know, we have beer connoisseur as. We have, you know, my good old boys from the town of poppy. You know, drinking loggers. So we have everything. Our biggest seller is are pompy born logger. Then we have a very popular twenty East New England Ipa named for Route Twenty, which were just off of and are a lot of clot of sour that we have here today is our highest rated. But we also have our trips on twenty New England. That won silver medal in New York state and last July. So we're really across the board in our beers. We do Barrel Age Beers and everything. So our motto is kind of a beer for everybody. You know, I'll place for everybody and it's very just a you know, one of those types of places that everybody can feel comfortable at. Now I know Matt has a bunch of questions for you and we're going to squeeze billy over here because he's the brewer. But and and and do you folks, I mean, has it been tough through the pandemic? What was that all about? What was it like? So we adapted a lot and kind of made our name during the pandemic because we're in the middle of the farm on the outside. So I was a big advocate on opening up outdoor dining. We went and I converted our old dairy barn into an event facility, knowing that when the pandemic was over it would be a big demand for event facilities from corporations and people. We built pavilions with plexiglass siding and screen sighting so they be then after the pandemic they can gain places that people could bring their dogs and dine with their dogs because they weren't in the restaurant. So at the heart of the pandemic, we started delivering groceries in beer. I bought a van, we were doing family meals to go. We were hustling like you wouldn't believe. We kept it was a sixty five percent of our employees on throughout it and just found way to make it work and it really made our name during it. So it's pretty cool. That's amazing. Now I know I tooked him out this all the time. I'm a big farm to table type of guy. I love that. That whole concept of keeping these local eyes, using local ingredients, supporting local farmers, you local bakeries. Is that? How important is that to you when you do your beer and also in the meat and the and the and the stuff that you do with you barbecue, do you try to keep things as local as possible? Obviously, every every once when you got to kind of go outside and get stuff, source from out, you know, from outside the state, but do you try to keep these in state as much as possible? Yeah, so I'm actually on the board of directors for the State of the New York for the farm bureau, and so it's huge for me. We try to do as much as possible, but as you get bigger and and it's and it's harder to source everything locally. Now it's I try to advocate for local processing, so more processing facilities, so more local farms can sell two restaurants and other businesses. So it's huge, but we have a lot of work to do to try to get our farm products from New York state on the table of New Yorkers...

...and that's a big focus of ours. That's fantastic. Another question I want to ask you as far as what the whole craft brewing pro process. Now, the question I have about this is what got you involved in craft beer? I pretty much everyone, when you first an beer, everyone starts with like industrial a beer, right. Everyone starts with like Budweiser cores or something like that. What got you the Cross over into the craft beer world? I started growing barley for craft Berris. So I start to, you know, sell to them and get to know them and the industry and people like Paul who's standing over here from the brewers association right. He's saw sub and I started to learn about it and I realized our spot. I mean we're the real end of the day, I never brewed a beer in my life, but the location that we have, where you can view eight counties across New York sunsets like in our pictures, it was about the opportunity. For me, I saw an opportunity there and I went out and found a great brewer, found a great chef and the rest of it I do. I play on the events, I run the business. You know, that's that's what I'm good at. So I stay focused on what I'm going at and I let them do what they're good at and that's been the recipe for success. Well, let's get billy over here for crying out loud. Right. So, billy, thank you for joining us. You're the brewer here at Heritage Hill, and now what got you in a craft there? How did you how did you start doing this? The dude that you brew at home? Did you drink indust realize beer, like, what the Hell Am I drinky? How is your getting to craft beer? It was a combination of both. Actually. My older brother had a decade on me and got me into I'm a gang when I was an adolescent and pretty much started homebrewing nineteen. Started Commercial Brewing when I was twenty one and I've been doing it now for five years professionally. Taking home a couple metals. Change burries quite a bit, but I found my home here at heritage and we're doing well. When in metals, being creative, I get to fill wine barrels, Whiskey barrels, Bourbon barrels and stretch my wings, be creative and have fun. So what do you what's your favorite kind of beer that you would drink? UTICA club? I love that. That's billy. Yeah, belly billy's got it going on. He's number one, got a sense of humor and, second of all, he knows what he's doing. That's cool. Now, how big of a brewery is it heritage? I mean how many barrels? It's a ten barrel system. We have five ten Baril fomentors, five hundred and twenty barrel from mentors, a split five, currently thirty seven barrels full of Oak, oak age beer. Also, we have serving tanks, so they act as bright tanks, but they're hooked up to the draft system, so that helps with saving grace on space for cold storage. And Yeah, we're constantly scaling and growing, which is incredible, and seeing what we can do. All right. How do people get there? Where is it so they can come and visit you? So we're right off eighty one, which is an interstate through upstate in New York. I don't know how far it reaches this way, but really easy to get to. Awesome petting zoo, great barbecue food, beautiful views, always live music and the beers. All right. So who does the barbecue stuff? I mean you do your own pulled park and breast getting all at right there. Yep, everything's made fresh to order every single day. We don't freeze or we he any of our barbecue food. We have award winning pit master who is running the show over there and amazing kitchen staff to help him back up all the other stuff. And we also offer some pub fairs Burgers that all the beef comes off of our own cattle farm. That's all grain fed from all of our spent barley from my brewing process. So it's all self sufficient for farm to fork brewery. That's so cool and that that's a fantastic one. More question I want...

...to ask you as far as the beer making process goes. Now, I talk to our craft our craft brewers, and obviously there's a there's a lot of trends. There's a sours DIPA's are big right now. Soldiers went out. They're kind of going down a little bit, but they're still kind of you know whatever. I've talked to most brewers and most brewers have said what they like making the most are loggers and pills ners because, even though people who drink them may not know how complicatedly are, it's really hard to mess I mean it's really easy to mess up a pills or logger because you can taste the impurities in that. What's your thought process on it? One hundred percent. The reason that I my Goto beer is UTICA club is because, at the end of the day, when I'm thinking about beer, making beer, processing beer, you know, coming up in new recipes eight hours a week, the last thing I want to do when I sit down to have a beer is think about what I'm drinking. I want a nice, clean, crisp beer that I don't have to think about what I'm tasting. Just you, Toka Club. You know what you're getting into, you know how it's going to taste and it's simple beer that you don't have to think about. Yes, impurities shine a lot more. So it's harder craft with logger beer, but once you master that, much like every other craft of brewing, you're making incredible loggers if as long as your recipe developments there, and water chemistry as well, awesome. I beg. I'm good. Jim, he's Zip. I know we can't, we can't top this. This is great. We're here were the guys from Heritage Hill Brewery in where is it? It's in poppy New York ork. I have no idea where that is, but I might have to hunt that down and take grilled this on the row. BARBACUES and craft beer. And you know, we're grill this. We and we're about grilling and craft beer. So the kind of embulately execer we talked about here. Matt and Jim, we're here at a Belmont Racetrack with the New York State Brewers Association in Live Actually Festival here today were, you know, but I love this place. This is great. We're almost done today, Matt, you know we are, but we'll be back with more. So stay with us. Matt and Jim here Grill this and we're here with Paul Leone, the chief. He's the executive direct I know, I know he's the Executive Director Director of the New York State brewers association and this has been a wonderful festival, especially for Matt and I. We have sampled some of the finest brews in the in the state and in the world. I mean some of these beers are world class, things you'd never think of and thanks for being with us. We appreciate it. Thanks for guys coming all the way down to Belmont Racetrack for this event. That's been awesome time, Paul. Number One, great event that you pulled on. Number two, how's IT, Hawes? It feel to have the TURL that you're having in such a great landmark place in New York City here? You know, with all of our beer festivals, there's beer festivals like the typical beer festival right, which would be like convention center, pipe and drape thing. That's fine if you're into that. For us we try to do things more experiential and so having, you know, a beer festival at Belmont Racetrack, the third leg of the triple crown, watching racing, professional racing. I mean these races like twenty five thousand dollar like purses. These horses are winning. It's really good and also from a beer festival perspective it breaks up the drinking right in a lot of way. So it's not four hours of getting drunk, getting shitty drunk. All right, all right, getting shitty drunk on Beers. It's have a couple beers, but on the races, watch the races. People are out there cheering. It just we try to be more than just a beer festival but introduce people to the best in New York Beer. That that there is now. We talked with chloe before from the New York State brewers association and it's such a fun time for Matt and I...

...to come here and visit and hear the stories about how these craft breweries were created and and and New York's and hear the stories about New York states supporting all of this. It's just a wonderful thing. And and and you know, every once in a while you run into a beer and you go, Oh my God, I've never tasted anything like that. Brewers have gotten really good over the years. It just making but first all there's no boundaries, right. I mean they'll brew anything with anything like it just it's good and not they've just gotten so good over the years that that you're tasting great beers all around. They've they really mastered their craft right. So, but brewery opens, their beer might be okay, you know, on occasion, but give them time to really kind of find their rhythm. And you know, that's what you're seeing here with a lot of these breweries that have been around for a long time, is that they're in their group and they know how to make good beer, no matter what it is. IPA, loggers. A lot of loggers here, sours pilsners. So yeah, the funny thing is that you mentioned that. I talked to a lot of brewers here today. I don't a lot of them talking about that right, that the loggers and the pilsners. They're really focusing on that because obviously it's it's a lot more cup kids people think. However, Jim makes a good point. Everything that we're tasting today is fantastic. It's it. There's a lot of people that put a lot of effort. It's a whatever the making out here. Yeah, a lot of these brewers are, you know, a lot of them still earned survival mode right, and so doing events like this is important. They come out make sure that everybody knows that they're still there and that they're making good beer and and it's really hopefully the people that come to a beer festival find a brewery that they didn't know about before and say, Oh, this is really good beer, I need to have these guys and or women, like there's a lot of women here too. So, so, yeah, so it's what are we up to now? Five hundred and sign for we're number two in the country, behind California and New York. Is Is. Yeah, we're a player where we have more than wineries. I mean we're the biggest segment right now. So cool. Where are we going from here? What's up next in terms of another festival? Oh Yeah, so we've got a couple throughout the year. We've got Buffalo Festival happening in June twenty five, right vibes craft beer and music festival July ninth at Heritage Hill Brewery. That's a big one, and then landmark theater November nineteen. So didn't we just interview Heritage Hill Brewery? We sure did, come on the bright fest of all. Yeah, so that's our that's our for A. we're trying experiential right. So we're doing a craft beer and music festival and good food, right. So we're trying to do more than just the drinking. It's a full day camping, the whole deal, nationally touring bands, the whole deal. So so that's our again, we're trying to like make craft beer more approachable for everybody, more fun, and then that's our thing. I know I've asked us to you before. I'll Paul, but I'll ask you to you one more time. If someone is not really been involved in the craft beer seen, if someone's like had an occasional budweiser or something like that, what would your advice be? That to have them try out and is coming kind of come through and check out the vibe here. You mean at festivals, people, not the PSIVAL's craft beer in general. Look at so the reason why one of the things you're seeing like more pilsners and loggers at these things. If you have to think about a crap, beer is still only thirteen percent of the entire market, which means eighty seven percents, and I don't do math, by the way, eighty seven percent of the rest of the population is drinking macro of are right, which is pilsners and loggers and all of that. If you want to get people more interested in craft beer, make a beer that they're used to and more approachable and and let's get them, let's reel them in a little bit and say, Oh yeah, I've got a beer. Oh you like coors light, like Bud Light, like, whatever you like, what you like like. I'm not, I'm not shitting on those, those beers. I mean I that's where I started, right. I mean I, you know, had...

...spud McKenzie. I'm dating myself, spude McKenzie, I remember the dog, yeah, the duck. I had those in my college storm room. Right. So I started there. I would just say, you know, events like this and breweries they have a beer you like. I always say, Oh, I don't like beer. Yeah, you do, you just haven't found the right one yet, right. And so beer festivals are a great thing to do that, because if you don't like it, you can dump it, but go visit your local brewery and and just try it. If you don't like it, you don't like it, it's okay, but you're going to find a whole bunch of great people to partner up with and love all that. Yeah, and mad and I ought to be worth twenty five more percent plus thirteen. Come, HA, ha ha. I'm like two people. So we're good. Yeah, you guys are the best, like, you're doing such good things. I'm glad you're here and yeah, I really am happy that you're hair. We have, we have so much fun coming here and here in the stories. That's what we're about. Yeah, and the food. To that mean the foods. I shouldn't say it out, dude, I gotten this. This is not about the food. This event. I'll say, Hey, well, you don't watch, we wove food here. I know you are food guys. So I'm sorry about the food. It's event, but Oh, we're it's all good. I've belt. But like heritage that you said. They do great barbecue and stuff and that's going to be fantastic. We're looking forward to the next festival, looking forward to see you again, Paul. You've been so humble, so hospitable to us, and we love it. So we're obviously want to keep being here for all of this and free past every single one of our events. Boy, don't we love free that's polly only and birds to where its will call. There we go, Jim Yeah, there we go, Matt and Jim here. This is grills, where live, and Belmont race track for the right. The almost said Rochester. Say The no. New York State Brus associated. Thank you so much, Paul. Thank you, guys. Appreciate you in your girl. This will be right back. Heys, Matt Wilson here at girl this podcast. I Lost Jim. Now you know it gets crazy around here doing this and we're sampling all these beers and I think Jim got lost of the bi somewhere, maybe beutting us some horses or getting a drink, which is fine because it's a great time out here. Just want to say a big thank you to Pau Leone and everybody WHO's part of the New York State Craft who was association. They put on a great of that here at the Belmont. We had a fantastic time sampled a bunch of different beers. Thinking about to sign out for being Jim. I think Jim's down the process of having fun and I want to have some fun too, so we're going to sign off and just enjoy the rest of the festival. But thank you so much for listening to our podcast today. Again, you can find us on spotify, twitter. I heart not twitter, spotify, I heart where we get your podcast. Also, go to grill this podcastcom and if you go to grill this podcastcom all the pictures that were taking taken at the festival be up there as well, so you can see all the people that we got to see and meat to talk to you. It get us a beautiful event. It was well done. We had a fantastic time. So, for Jim Sammon, it's Matt Wilson. This is the girl this podcast, and we will see you next time out.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (56)