Grill This!
Grill This!

Episode 50 · 1 month ago

Sena Sea

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this Episode, Wild Alaskan Fish is on the menu! Jim and Matt speak with the founder of Sena Sea Foods, Sena Wheeler. Sena operates outside of Seattle Washington and has a masters degree in Nutrition and Food Science Her company, Sena Sea Seafoods ships fresh, never-farmed fish straight from the waters of Alaska all across the country. Jim opens up a sample package and uses one of the recipes found on her website, senasea.com, to prepare some Potato Crusted Salmon in a Beurre Blanc sauce! Of course, Matt brings some amazing craft beers to sample as well. Listen to Sena's story and find out how the fish that Jim prepared turned out!

It's time to take your grilling skills to the next level. We will take you from grill disaster to grill master. So grab your tongue and your pint glasses. Get ready to grill this with Matt Wilson and Jim Salmon. Hey, everybody, welcome to grill list. Jim Salmon here along with Matthew t Wilson, and today the tea stands for unbelievably fresh, wild caught fish out in the ocean. Here it does. So we're gonna have a lot of fun. We have a special guest with us, which we'll get into in a minute. Um, the first of all, this is the grillest podcast is. We're pushing a hundred episodes. Matthew, a little man. Yeah, now we're in a half a million range. Yeah, something like that. Well, you know, chump change or whatever. Uh. So you can get grill is at my heart, which is Um. Well, we say that first because we both worked there. And UH, sort of. And Yeah, and spotify and and apple and sounder and wherever else you would get a podcast and get grilled. This not in the least technical guy in the world. Just have it sent right to your phone and Matthew could probably tell you how to do that. You like it, or you know you're turned on by it, or whatever it takes to get it right to your phone right or here's the easiest way to do it. Go to grill this PODCAST DOT COM. That's right, I forgot. I keep forgetting about that. Uh. Please, welcome to grill list. We have a special guest with us. Sina Wheeler is a third generation fisherman and you know, I don't know anybody that doesn't like fishing, but this is this is fishing on steroids. This is pretty cool. Uh, the name of her company is called sent us Sen us. See. Please welcome to UH grill this, Sina Wheeler. Hello, hi, how are you guys? Thanks for having me. Well, you're welcome. You're welcome every there's nobody that doesn't like fishing, right, I mean this is you've been doing this all your life, right, pretty much. Well, I've been a part of it all my life. So I go on the boat. Well, I go on the boat with my husband and our kids and I used to go fish with my dad in the summer and of course my GRANDPA was fisherman, my uncle's for fisherman, my grandpa before him. In Norway. We have it's actually, you know, I've been saying three generations and that's kind of lazy because I'm just counting what I see. You know, my me and my husband, my dad, my grandfather, but it goes back generations in Norway before he immigrated. So it's actually much further and I do much more of the home side of things, but we love to get out on the boat. Uh, if you're listening to this and you'd like to follow along, the website is uh Sena C dot Com. That's S E N A, s e a Dot Com. And Uh, you are wild caught, uh, providers of fish right. Yeah, wild caught and in Alaska, and I like to make that clarification because why all this is important, and also the fact that we're doing in Alaska, which is this huge, pristine, incredible area. So these fish are returning to these pristine, wild rivers Um with glaciers. It's it's an incredible place and I should say it's commercial fishing. So if you're imagining a pole, this isn't that. So is it like that? You ever saw that show that the deadliest catch is it? Are you all there like that? With the boats and the wild waters and the ice, cold waters and trying to catch the fish that way. Or is it it is a little more more Camm than that? Well, I would say it's it's more calm, but it's similar, so that life on the boat is not a huge departure. We have guys that have broken on my husband's salmon boats. Salmon boats are much smaller, one or two guys, but he's broken guys that have been on the deadliest catch. So we know some of those fish out there. It's all Alaska. You know, it's tight. It's an industry. Um, guys will fish on multiple boats. So it's not far fetched. But the real key deadliest catches filmed in the winter. crabbing is done in the winter and that those storms and ice. That adds a whole another element. So though, and those boats are bigger. So when we do longlining, Hall of it, Black Cod, different types of fish, bigger boats to look a little bit more like that deadliest catch Um, but they're gonna be smaller. Different quota system. And then you get to salmon and you're on a much smaller one or two guy boat and then it's very much not like deadliest catch. Now I was reading, UH, your little biography here from your website and says you have a master's degree in nutrition and Food Science with a specialty in qualifying Omega Three's. Tell us about that. Um. Well, my Undergrad I went for nutrition,...

...so I have a degree in nutrition and then I have a master's and feed science. So basically I wanted to go the more science route than the nutrition route and I applied for Grad School and to get into the college that Oregon State and needed an advisor and and they needed somebody in fisheries and they said that, you know, they'd like somebody that could be would be comfortable going out on the boat or working with fish. So I just emailed them. I gave him my history. I was, you know, I don't know, twenty one at the time. I emailed them here's here's my family history. I've been on the boat with my dad, you know, for summers. He was hired. Done. Okay, that's great. So I got my master's degree working with fish and and I was quantifying Omega three, so actually pulling the Omega Three's out of the fish, that pulling the flesh out at different zones and quantifying how much of the fat is Omega Three's, and that's for the health benefits that people are really interested. So the fish with high, really high Omega threes, like Copper River Salmon, sable fish. We'll get to that. And then what I was really looking at is what zones in the fish. So you get into like the belly flap not has really High Omega Three D's compared to the tails. I'm stunned. I had no idea that any of that. You know there was a difference. That's fascinating stuff. I've heard of Omega three fatty a said. I know that a lot of a lot of doctors will have people take that to enmerge the nutritional lifestyle. I guess which. I used to take Omega three fatty acid for the UH when I used to lift weights for and I don't know why everyone's take the Omega three is good for weightlifting. Yeah, yeah, now you sent us here at Grill this uh, I think you call it like a sampler pack, and it had it had two pieces of Copper River Salmon, which we just cooked and we'll talk about that in a second. I didn't screw it up. No, and UH UH sable fish a couple of pieces of tablefish and some Black Cot. Now I had never heard of black cod. Is that different than regular cod? I mean what? Or is that just that particular cod is unique to Alaskan waters? Well, the black cod is the table fish. So it's a two names on the same fish and we're coming O each other from two different coasts here. But Um, I'm from the Pacific northwest in Washington state, and over there we called black cod and and we fish for black cod and it's called black cod on our fish ticket, but it's often on the east coast called Sable Fish, and the FDA they prefer we call it table fish. That's the kind of the term. So I call it both. I call it black cod or sablefish black cod, and so it's the same fish. But you're not alone not not really realizing that they're the same or understanding what that is at all. Okays, the reason behind that is the is the reason my because I know a lot of times they'll rename a fish because it sounds more desirable to eat. Is Do you think that's why they did that, or is there just a yeah, you know, it's really funny. Black Cod is just it's such a it's a really, really good fish. It's it's high on the Omega threes we talked about, so high fat. It's really silky and rich. But it's not a cod. So how it ever got the name Black Cod, I don't know. But it's one of those fish that goes by many names and I think that that's one reason. You know, as an industry we're supposed to use the term sable fish, but it's funny because on our fish tickets when we catch it it's just black cod. I guess the other one was hell of it. That was in the same place. Yeah. So, Um, when when the package arrived? Um, you could feel it on the outside and you shipped it from Washington, right. Is that where it came from? Yeah, yeah, yeah, all the way to Albia, New York, right, and that's a three or four thousand, three thousands something. And you know, you could still feel that it was cold on the outside. It was packed in dry ice and and all six of those pieces of fish were frozen solids still after a couple of days of shipping. That's amazing. Oh, I love hearing that because we we packed those boxes so careful. They're like our little babies. We packed them up, we Han pack, we, you know, put paper and it's all about no air in the packaging and we ship across the country and I have people in Florida, people in New York that just can't believe it when it comes and you're getting that off the boat quality to your door, which is our mission. So I'm super glad to hear that. And again, if you want to order some right now, get out ahead of this. S E N A, s e a CENA C dot Com. Now, Um, I noticed there's some other things on your on your upsite, like...

...crab and shrimp and so forth, and I was interested in that particular kind of shrimp that I had never heard of. Um, darning, and I don't have it right in front of me. Yeah, spot shrimp. You ever heard of that? What does spot shrimp? It looked really good. It almost looked like like lobstery, you know. Yeah, spot shrimp is big, so it could also be called prawns. I've looked at when you're naming food, you have to be really different areas with different names. So it could also be called a prown because of the size. Um, but they're the biggest kind of juiciest, sweetest shrimp, shrimp out of Alaska. Really, that's they're caught with pots. We have to try that, you know, definitely try that. Yeah, yeah, I'm I'm starving for that now. I've seen people each prawns. I know it's an Asian food. It's cooked, it's use a lot, uh, and I've had it. It's delicious. Now, uh, you also obviously, in addition to being Fisher people, fisherman or whatever. You know, I could mess that up, but uh, you, you also have to have some kind of a packaging facility. Right. Tell us about how the fish comes off the boat, what happens to it? How do you get it so frozen so quick, and all of that stuff. Yeah, so we started just as a fisherman. My husband fished for these, fished for over twenty years and we decided, you know, basically we're so spoiled. We have this freezer full of amazing fish and we decide to share that with people, and so kind of the idea of okay, well, how do we get them the best quality? Really the concept was like what we're used to Um and we eat frozen fish in the winter, and that we determine that to be the best way to get that consistent quality. Like you're talking about receiving it frozen. You get to put it in your freezer, eat it when you want and pull it out and it's that perfect high quality from Alaska. So we went with the frozen and Um. At the time we were having it cut by a small custom facility and over the years Um that was gonna that's the hardest part is for a fisherman to get there your your fish cut just right, just how you want Um, because there's big processors and they just do it however they want Um. So the little custom processing facility came up for sale and we got some investors together and we bought it and that was a really big deal. It's a big deal for the community. It's a small town in Cordova where we fish no roads in only boat or airplane, but to have a small custom shop where fishermen can get their own fish cut is a really big deal rather than a really the big processors where you don't see that fish, it goes on a barge and it's out of there. So we do that. We cut our fish for scene to see. We cut um fish for other fishermen we cut in the community and we really really worked on my husband runs that also, and it's all about the high quality and retaining all of the fish. So we get to do fun stuff like we scraped the backbone so there's no waste and we make patties with that. So being that involved with even the cutting of the fish and the freezing, you know, the packaging and the freezing, we get to do it really premium quality, but we get to do it just how we want and and really kind of use we're making the most out of every fish. That's so cool. We're visiting today with Sena Sea from scena wheeler, Excuse me, from Sena Sea. That's our tongue twisters, a third generation fishing person. We're gonna WE'RE gonna go off the board here a minute and try one of our Craft Beers. But I wanted to ask you. There's always this UH advertising. Well, Matt and I were an advertising business, so we we entered interact with lots of different people, right and and so you know I mean you learn to read people. And when I went to your website, what I was impressed with was the fact that you're you're right out there, honest with everything, including the UH sustainability that's really important to you. You can't just fish it out, and you know you're you're very conscious of that, um. And also you you talk about, Um, the challenges of the shipping and how much time and energy you put into that. Uh. And I was just impressed with all of that, Um and because you don't always get all the truth right out of the box, you know, and you guys laid it all right out there. It's pretty cool. Um. So we're gonna take a quick hiatus here and grab a craft beer. What are we doing first? Now you a craft beer guy, a galler or no? Oh yeah, but I'm going to be jealous here. Ok. Yeah, well, you can just watch what we're doing. So when do we have first here, Matthew, I mean, you're tantalizing me with this one beer.

You've been sending me pictures of it all week. I gotta get it out real quickly. There you go. When we get back to sea, we're going to talk about the difference between farmed and wild Um. And also, I'm gonna ask her, there's the certification called our FM, and I don't know what that is. It's a so we'll let her explain the whole thing. So what do we have here, Matthew? All right, well, you know, we're fresh back from the beer festival in Buffalo, from Canal side, which we had a fantastic the New York State Brewer Association Craftier Festival. It was a warm day but the brewers were nice and cold and we had so much fun. We had a blast. We took the whole remote broadcast a grill list set it up right there, and so check out the last episode. It's right there where you get your podcast, and you also can see that the pictures on our facebook page and also on our website go to this podcast dot com. Anyways, I have a beer from there, but we're not gonna start with that one. We're gonna start with this one. I'm gonna show seen the picture of this, if you can see that. So if you've ever watched the movie goonies, that towns degree. We were blocks away from the original Guoni House. Really, yes, that's cool. This is this is. This is inspired by goonies. It's called boat drinks five. It's my tie inspired inspired Sour Ale. It's a common combination or collaboration between mortalis brewing and swift water. And if you can see the image now, what was this? A slot at slot at slots from goonies on the cannon for the CANNART. It's insane. So it's a standard a B D. it's about six six point uh so. The ingredients Sour Ale brewed with pineapple, orange lime and or get. I don't even know what that is. O R G E A T. have you ever heard of that? I've seen it. Yeah, say that again. Or get O R G A T. or is it organ? I don't know when, whenever there's something on there, I don't know. It scares me, but whatever. So I remember one of the tricks that Paul I owned. I thought of this roll the CAN. I used to flip it upside which also works. But if you roll it, you can get into you can mix up all because there's supposedly some pulping right exactly. So you don't you don't want to, you don't have the stuff at the bottom and then just have like the lights up at the top and get that stuff. You don't shake it be could you spare yourself? So I think you rolled it enough. I'm thirsty. Here we go. The finest sound ever, put off by a podcast right there. Do you have a lot of craft breweries and in where you are? Well, yeah, I'm in Washington state, near Seattle area, and that's a big craft roofplace. Yeah, okay, cool. So if you can see the color, it's almost like orange juice. It is orange juice, maybe with a hair of I don't know, man or something something like that alight. So here we go. Try. It's delicious. That is a wonderful brewer out there. A little higher on the on the dollar bill there. Yeah, so these are not cheap, I'm assuming because of the ingredients and also probably the CANNART. And again that's a collaboration between two breweries, swiftwater and more Talis. For four pack of ease, you're looking at about almost thirty dollars. Yeah, you know. That's why, when we first set up this podcast, I said I'll do a grilling something. I'll buy the steaks and roast and you buy all the craft here. Oh that that's a wonderful, delicious more tals kicks it out of the park. They um so cina. I wanted to ask you because when people advertise, uh, you're here farmed, you are frozen fresh, uh, and then once in a while wild cotton. Um. The same thing with clams and other types of seafood. I mean, we're Matt and I are both. There's not a seafood. We don't. So what what makes I think I already know the answer to this, but I don't know. Wild versus farm. So give us your take on that. I will. I will tell you first I'm incredibly biased on this. That's okay. We understand biased wild fishing, wild fishery for generations, and so we're definitely proponents of wild fishing. And the reasons are, number one, just the tasting quality. If, if, if you're just a foodie or you just want to eat the best it's it's going to be the wild product. So across the board it's going to have the better flavor and texture. And that's just simply. It's out eating what it's supposed to eat. It's out wild in...

...the oceans. Um, it's eating the Krill and the things and the seaweed. You know, I probably said all that wrong, but Um, it's not eating fish pellets or die or antibiotics and all of the things. If, if it's farmed, it's typically going to be in some sort of a penn situation. There's farming inland in sort of Um pond and then there's farming out in the ocean and they're sustainable farming, and I'm doing air quotes because I don't you know, it just depends on kind of their definition there. But the fish farming has its own inherent kind of drawbacks and a lot of that is just has to do with a lot of fish in the closed, close small area, so they're not getting the exercise and not getting the Diet and all of that Um and, you know, possible antibiotics. So that kind of just for taste and texture, I always go with wild Um. And then the health. So we have the Omega Three. So just like we've hit on before with the Omega Threees, the fish are out swimming, they're getting exercise, they're putting on the appropriate fat and if you have a fish in a pen, it's it's not putting on the appropriate fat. Might Have Omega threes, but it might also have too many Omega sixes. You don't get the right ratio. So the seafood you are eating isn't providing the Omega three trees that you might be hoping to your body Um. And then there's the environmental so, like I said, some fish farms say that they're sustainable. I don't know what you know measures there they're going off of. But when we're talking about wild fishing, we're talking about fishing for the future. So we're keeping that. It's it's about managing the fishing for for the fishing stock, so making sure that there are fish um for the future. So for Salmon, for example, um it's a it's all fish in Alaska is sustainably managed. So they're managing that catch. So Um, Hall of it, Black Cod, rock fish, salmon is all managed for sustainability. And so what that means is looking at the total catch and deciding how much needs to Um, you know, stay there for production, for for reproduction for the future, and how much can be fished on. So for Salmon, they're actually, you were fishing when they're spawning. So they're counting the fish going up river. So we don't even put a net in the water until there's something like a million pounds gotten through up to the upper river and then there's very um specific openings when we can fish for say, twelve hours at a time. Twice a week, very careful, so that these fished and spawn and do what they need to do. So so the wild is also for the environment and and some people, you know this, the messaging and wild versus farm has gotten very confusing for people and sometimes people choose farm because they don't want to, you quote, eat the last wild salmon and and they've been kind of taught that, oh, we should save the Salmon for, you know, the beards or whatever and not eat the wild salmon. Well, yeah, people think like that and what I like to tell people is if it's in the store, it's not the last wild salmon. You know, trust us, and especially in Alaska, and that's where we fish, is Alaska, and it it is managed for sustainability and you're not going to be eating the last wild salmon because we won't catch it, because we're just catching off the numbers that is allowed. So, Um, when you think about it, I'm gonna even take it one step further and if you decided, you know what, I'm not going to eat that wild salmon, I'll just go with farmed or whatever, then the whole industry. They don't stop catching the fish, it's just if people don't value that fish, they don't get the money, they don't get paid for that fish. The industry kind of suffers and then what happens is fishermen end up catching more or the industry cuts corners or the prices dropped because people aren't supporting or valuing the wildfish. So if you think about it in reverse, when you value that wildfish or invest in that wild fish for your health, you're also investing in this sustainable wild fishing industry that it can do things right like what we're doing and utilize the whole fish. So it's actually kind of for some people that's a flip, but I'll get off my soup box. No, that's good. That's good. That's good stuff. I I assume that there's a lot of rules about fish labeling and what they what it has to be labeled. So if it's wild, it's got to say wild and if it's farm it's got to say farmed. Right, right. So when you're looking, when you're at the grocery store and you're looking, I always say definitely look for wild. In a restaurant, if it's wild, they'll say wild because they...

...probably spent more money on it, and so they're not gonna spend the extra dollar get wild fish and then not put wild on the menu. So when I'm at a restaurant I look for wild. The same thing at a grocery store. Um, Costco, grocery stores anything, if it's wild, it'll say wild. The other thing you can look for is the word Alaska, because there's no fish farming allowed in the state of Alaska. Oh that, I didn't know that. Yeah, and that's part of why that fish and you know why they're so wild and pure and the rivers haven't been fouled with fish farming and things like that. Um. So look for those words wild, Alaska. And then another clue on wild is a lot of times fuels. It'll talk about what river it came from. So, Copper River, salmon, that's the river it came from. Um, so that's just one more layer of identification. There's a perfect time to tell the folks what we had to eat. Here. There's an episode of Grilla list. They're all chomping at the bed right. I had one quick question, because talking about wild and fresh and all that stuff, are you a fan of imitation crap? You know I couldn't feed you better questions because you know they were I talked to you guys about for my masters it was a Freemi lab. The other professor was studied Serreemi and he which is fake crab, and they were, you know, studying ways to make it and all these things. And you know it's made of pollock, it's made of fish, and so it's made mostly with fish proteins, which isn't bad. Um, the nutritionist side of me, it's just that they're sugar added. Yeah, I figured, well right, I mean, so we had when the when the package came. Um, I don't cook a lot of fish, I really don't. My wife loves fish and she likes Haddock, so I cooked that for her, you know, every once in a while. But so I'm trying to decide whether I should cook the Halibut, Sable Fish, or the or the salmon. I thought, well, my name is Samon, might as well try it. So I in the box was this recipe for potato crusted salmon from sennessee. Uh, and it was. This recipe was created by chef Frank Eagle at lavelle's Bistro in Fairbanks, Alaska, and it says potato and crusted salmon and I thought, well, that it looks easy, and then I looked at the recipe and then you have to make this thing called a bare blons sauce, which I'm not fresh and but I made the sauce. It took a lot, you know, be proud of me, Matthew. And Uh, then you you, you take these shredded potato things and you cook this fish upside down in some oil and butter and it crisp, crispit for about eight minutes Um, and then you flip it over and let it go a minute or whatever, and then you put this, uh, this bare blond sauce on the plate and then the salmon on top of that and then, of course I had to dump the rest of it on top of that. It was it was delicious, awesome. I was telling Jim I didn't know what to expect because it was it was here and I got here he was finishing preparing it. So I did see the potato crusting on it and I saw that was crisping up and something like okay, I'm excited to try this. It's delicious, that the quality of fish is amazing and that recipe that was included is off the chain. It's delicious. It's a great way to prepare salmon and I'm going to do this at home. My wife also loves salmon, so I think I'm going to have to try to make that one for her too as well. Well, I'll give you the card. I appreciate it that there's hundreds of recipes on DOT com. Well, you can check out all kinds of things, so really interesting site. You give you a look into anything you could ever think of. How far do you ship? We ship in the lower forty eight so that the continue continuous us. No Alaska or Hawaii, which is kind of ironic because but we bring it from Alaska down to Washington and that's where we live and then I ship it from Washington. So it works really well, Um, on the mainland. By the way, we did take pictures of the cooking process and the end results and they will be available on our facebook page and also on grilled this podcast. Dot Com. You can see the pictures of that delicious fish. That said, Jim and I had a chance to indulge yourself, and it was, it was. It was extremely delicious. For Verification and UH, instruction, I'm really impressed. You know, I have different recipes that we put in the box and a lot of times I'll try to put in what's kind of season all. Um, you know what might have seasonal...

...ingredients and and you you got kind of a challenging Jim always goes big. We, uh, we cook you name it. If it was once alive, we cook it here. You know it's we have a lot of fun there. Um, we're we're broadcasting from the Salmon Ranch Broadcast Studio and here at the ranch we we have a pretty extensive outdoor kitchen area. And Uh, and by the way, just because I almost forgot to mention this thing, as you guys brought it up, uh, the salmon ranch cowboy cooking show number two is up on the Youtube. That's right, it's on our that's on our youtube channel, grilled this podcast. If you look it up also, I have a link, but we have a link right to it on grill this podcast dot comic. You girl there. You can watch number two. I had a blast being there and filming it. I think I gained twenty pounds. It was it was a great day. It's a lot of fun. You did a good job. I appreciate it. So if you get the chance to check out the same ranch cowboy cooking show. And if you haven't seen number one and you're looking for a good relaxing laugh, that was a lot of fun. So I you know, when I first reached out to Cina, I said you want to come to the to the studio and do it live with us, right, and she said, wow, we're in Washington. All right, we're working on we're gonna have ourselves at seven forty. Next we'll have our own private plane. Now, do you folks have, because you know Matt, Matt's pretty well off. I mean he's got a lot of money and you know he's in a really, really close circle of millionaires and billionaires. So for the people that have everything, right, do you have? You folks have a Gift Card type of program? Oh, yeah, we do. We have a gift card M super easy. You just buy it online and then, Um, it comes in an email and you can just forward the email onto the recipient or printed off. Um, yeah, we have a lot of we do a lot of that at Christmas time and a lot of gifting. You would be surprised how many. Well, Father's Day is big fresh and Christmas time, but where the where the man that has it all, while the last is a real hit. Don't let Jim fool you. I'm not the moment as it all. Um, I was. I was going through on your website at scene a CE, S E N A s e a Dot Com and, uh, look at it. Some of them, I don't know what you call them, packages that you can get, I guess, Um. And is there a custom available for that? Or you have to get what's pretty much right on the website. So so you want twenty pounds of Salmon or whatever, you can reach out to you and you'll do that too, right. Yeah. Well, I really I try to get on the website kind of what people are usually into and what they like to buy. So I will watch kind of as people place orders and combine certain things. I'll go, oh, that looks great and I'll create a bundle because it makes it really easy. And then you can order on the east coast in the in the middle of the night while I'm sleeping. I get it. Yes, my wife also loves that when when that stuff happens, right, I get it. Well, that's interesting. Can also email me. I'm really, really present in my inbox and and our email list is actually how we communicate with people and I let them know what's in season and what's going on and and great recipe ideas and things like that. So I do a lot of communication. Where I'm people might ask, you know, I'm new to wild salmon. What should I what should I try? And well, how about this and how about that? So I do a lot of that type of communication inbox. Um. So I'm always open for reaching out an email to it's uh, Info at Cina, se doctum INFO scene to see dot com go up memory and and Sina. You. You respond directly, social you. That's respond to those. It's not a higher out person or like that. Oh yes, I respond to all the emails. I write all of our emails, Um for our email list, which people get to kick out of because I talked about rich and the kids and all the fish and but I respond to all the emails and if you call the phone phone number, you'll get me too, if you're lucky, because if I'm driving with three king sometimes you which totally makes sense, you know. Also on the website there are, uh, some accessory type things, like there's some hot sauces and I'll asking sea sea salt and all kinds of cool stuff. Now I also because, and you have to forgive us here, Sina, because Matt and I we want mayhem, stuff falling apart. We want because that's more entertaining. Sometimes. We would love to interview your husband, maybe on the boat breaking down when you're a hundred miles from shore and you know, or...

...all of a sudden it's leaking. You know, all that good stuff. I'll bet you have some stories there. Huh. Oh, well, he has stories. And then my dad has stories. He says he's never told us so stories. And in fact, on the website, which is kind of fun, I've been really pushing on my dad to write some of his stories. So I have a couple of his old fishing stories and I told him you he had done two stories for me. I said, if I get another story, I'll make a tab for you on the website so people can find all your stories, and so that's coming. He wrote me all more stories. That's cool. Well, those are good. Yeah, you should definitely get rich on and yeah, now do you you know, and you gotta forgive me for Um questions like us, but do you ever run into goofy stuff like whales or killer sharks and stuff from. I mean, do you ever run into that stuff up there? Oh yeah, the whales are really common. So, especially if you're long when we're salmon fishing, we're not far up the mouth of the river, so we're in the waves of the ocean but on really close to shore. Um. But when they're longlining, Um, it actually kind of the sound of the hum of the boat attracts whales. And so Um, now we have like black cod is often we're catching pots now because the black cod we have fish on a long line. It's going down miles and when you pull it up, every three feet is a fish and the whales learn to just dive down and just pluck those fish off like help themselves. That's so cool. So now we're fishing pots. They look a lot like crab pots, table fish that gets whaled on like that. Um, and you know, whales can just go back to catching their own fish. Those are like most little uh, those little cages sort of right. Am I saying that correctly? Yeah, yeah, okay, yeah, but a little small, UM, they're almost as big as a crab pot. So okay, all right, all right. Yeah, I love watching those crab guys and it's a heartbreaking when you go out there and you pull them up and there's nothing. All Right, Matthew's time for time for another craft beer here on grill list. That's what we do here. What do you have in mind? M I'll tell you that was really good, that last beer. That was so we're gonna go go back to more talice. We're gonna hit the beer up that we got from the festival a little bit later on, but we're gonna go back to more talents because this is an interesting one. So this is called from Hawaii with love. Uh. It is a stout. Now, if you've had a stout before, it's usually very dark, right. It is almost like almost like oil looking. This is a golden stout. So they took the darkness out of the Stout and it looks like it's a golden colored beer. So you can see through it and there's coconut and pineapple and coffee in this. That's all good. That's wonderful. This is very I know when we get more talents stuff, usually we're doing the sours, but I wanted to I wanted to kind of move away and try something the other stuff on this stout side. So this is an interesting one. What aren't you telling me about that one? I'm curious to get your tape. Well, yeah, but there's you're forgetting the number. Oh, yeah, I did forget about yeah, the A B D on this one is a little higher. It's at seven point. Oh, all right, we can handle that. Yeah, yeah, so, yeah, later you're gonna finish the kill me. Yeah, there you go. All right, so I'll try that. I'll give you a fresh glass over there in Matthew. I'm sorry seeing that you're not here. So bad, because we you know, that's that's that's the color of the stout. Okay, all right, that's different. It almost looks like the color of grapefruit juice. So we take the tape to this. You're ready, here you go, and that's a that's wonderful. Yeah, it's not. It's unlike any stove. I got a break. That's coffee comes flying out of there. Um, it's definitely a sour. It's a it's a stout actually you get from the pineapple in there. Yeah, Um, that's very good, but it's very complex, very complex. Ye, you taste the coconut a little bit too. But yeah, M Hmm. I had to taste that again just to make sure that I liked it. It's unique. Yeah, I like that. And the coffee comes way out of it, right out. Yeah, I wonder when they get when they put the coffee in. I don't know. And also how they take the color out of it. You know what I mean, because usually coffee is a darker color. So I don't know how they do that. Also a stout in general, it's usually dark. Right. So yeah, again you're looking...

...about twenty five dollars for four pack of these. Okay, now, that's a little less than the thirties, but thanks for buying and you're you're you're very welcome. Pleasure. So I don't know. I was gonna ask what whether her kids are going to be Fisher people. Now I noticed you're the picture on the website. Your kids are younger, right. Yeah, well, some of those pictures are getting a little old now, but I've three's Um, they've been since they were one year old, um, but now there's sixteen and ten. So you have dated photos on the website. But my son, being sixteen, he does he they all fish on the boat, but he just started last summer. He dead hands for my husband, but then he started fishing for other fishermen. So to for him that's the real deal, to go out on the boat with somebody else and be like, okay, Dad, you weren't full of it. This is this is really how it's done. So for him that's kind of a fun next step. And I would say bill at least fish through college, make some money and then, you know, whatever he wants to do after that, good for you. That's so cool. On this part of the world we have lots of oysters and clams and whenever I talked to anybody in Alaska, I don't hear much about that. Do you guys have clams there and and oysters and like lobster and stuff too? Or No, no lobster, but you know a little bit of oysters and clams. So what's interesting is Cordova, where we fish out of. So we go up in the summers. We don't live there year round, but I think there was an earthquake. I want to stay in the eighties, Um and they before the earthquake there were oyster beds everywhere. It was actually really famous for its oysters and in there was a really big earthquake and the the tide change by like a foot and it wiped out all the oyster beds and so no more oyster beds there. In fact, there's Um one place I know of that just started doing um oysters out of Cordova. So actually, and we have a connection, that the manager works at the planet at our facility at sixty north. So stay tuned. We might get some Alaskan Oysters. But they are are the common thing up there. So I'm super excited. I just got to try some and they're really good. So that was fun. Do you do you like when now we're talking about oysters? That a question. Uh. Do you like them cooked, steam, fried, raw or all of the above? All of the above. Um, we'll do them raw on the halfshell, you know, a little, a little hot sauce, a little, and then they're on the grill. You know, you throw them on the grill and then as soon as they they pop open a little bit, you pop them open and they're good to go. So I don't you know, basically those two ways. Absolutely. She's she's my new friends. Yes, that's so cool. Oh Gosh, you know, I i Matt and I just absolutely adore seafood and that's one of the big things we cook here at Gorillas Um, you know, clams and oysters and lobster and crab, all kinds of stuff. And I know, as you folks sell crab, that that's probably probably like a seasonal type thing. Yeah, it is seasonal and in fact we did we had king crab that we caught Um in Prince William sounds, so right near us. A lot of it is done out oh where they catching the king crab out way out in the burying sea right and so we actually did a test fishery right in Um Prince William Sound, which is near where our facility is. So we had that King Crab because we brought it in and we worked with the state of Alaska to kind of do that test fishery and then brought it in and processed it ourselves. So we just saw it when we can, you know, we have a local connection. So we did the king crab and then we did the tanner or the snow crab. So that was really interesting. The king crab was fantastic legs, you cannot you cannot be and the snow crab flavor to flavor. Even my kids we did a little taste test, because we're spoiled like that, you know, and the snow crab is a little sweeter, but you still can't beat the size of that, you know, like on the King Crab. So do you have any tips, because I know I'm pretty good, you know, I don't have any problems cracking the crab open and getting the meat out, but I know there are some people that don't eat crab because they think it's too much work. Are there any are there any tips that you can give to get that meat out of the crab? Oh, you should...

...ask my kids, because their biggest tip is to ask Dad. That's what happens at my house. Oh Dad, can you get this from me? Oh Dad, can you get and and you know he's helping them and I'm like, I'm not gonna help you. You show your own crab. You don't get any crab. That's what I'm talking about. Last I have two questions. First of all, a statement. Um. Last week I had a friend of mine who recently is recovering from an operation and I wanted to treat him for a Jilier out in the outdoor kitchen and he loves crab and I didn't want to put him through that whole thing. So I took the crab legs and I took the scissors and I thought him first and then I snipped him, like I made two canoes out of each crab leg right, and I pulled the tendons out and I stuffed a crab back in there. Then I heat it up butter, garlic and Chive and poured that all over and just heated it up and I had a whole giant tray of it. Nobody had to work. It was one. It was gone in sixty seconds. Jim, you have my phone number at your house. Yeah, yeah, crabs, CRABS COOL UM is all crab pre cooked. Yeah, Oh, that is one thing. What you are you guys have all the right questions. That is one thing that's really important. Is it has to be pre cooked and frozen legally to sell it. So when you buy crab in the shell, it's always pre cooked, and that when we started selling it. One of my biggest worries is that people would cook it again. You, if you buy it and boil it again, it will be overcot vulcanize it. Yeah, yeah, I had seen this silly little youtube thing about this couple. They were they were on the west coast. I got some crab and and Um, you know, you see them cooking it up and then they they looked up on you. They looked at there. It's a youtube show and they looked up on youtube how to cook crab and it told them to boil it. It and they're boiling it and we're watching going now. I normally do it. I steam it for a little bit. Not Usually. Know, I mean I don't uh. Yeah, boiling it's not good because you lose a lot of stuff. You get the moisture, it's still juicy. And what my husband's been doing. So we have it frozen and then he puts it on the grill. That's great, and then he puts just smoke to it, and so he's actually defrosting it slowly, but he's smoking it at the same time. Excellent. Try that on the PELLIC UM. I know this is dumb, so forgive me to begin with, but every time you watch one of those shows like the deadliest catch or whatever, and they're catching these giant, colossal king crabs, and not to get back to that, but and I love crab and I'm thinking to myself if I was on one of those boats, I'd have myself a little sternal thing. Right, crab, right, and the heating is as fast as I give my hands on it. I know, I was dumb. Sorry, that's all right. You know, we have we have cooks at our processing facility. We have cooks and on the boat, I'll say you every crab has to be accounted for, but in the processing facility is bought, it's paid for, it's registered. You know what I can't believe is when they're eating meals that don't have seafood in them. You know, you're in Alaska, and so when I come in, oftentimes I will jump in and and see what they're cutting today and jump in and cook some seafood. And you know, I feel like people that come and work at the plant they should Um, you know, you should be part of the reward is eating this. Yeah, absolutely, I think I'd be fish bells out there I eat so much of it. We're visiting today with Sina Wheeler. She owns SCENA CE, SCENAS SE DOT COM, which is a UH Gosh, they sell wonderful fish. They ship it all over the country and UH, they have recipes and a block. Do you write all that block stuff or just I know you said Your Dad contributed a couple of stories, but did other people right on their tour? It's mostly if if you're reading it, I probably wrote it. That's great. You know, one of the things that popped up on my think uh this week was Um, because sweet corns just about to hit here and uh so do I. There's this thing called cooler corn. You ever heard of that? This is I haven't either. And they take a Coleman Cooler, UH, wipe clean. Of course I don't know. All my coolers are filthy, but they wipe it and and they they fill it with already shucked ears of corn, UH and they get two kettles of boiling water, pour it over the corn, the corn, and closed...

...the top and wait for thirty minutes and when you open it the corner is perfectly cooked. Now you could cook thirty years of corn like that. Now we're routinely cooking that much here the ranch. But you know interesting the problem with stuff like that that you hear about you just don't want to risk it. Right if it didn't work, don't you usually store your cooked brisket cooler? Yeah, so I mean where you live in Washington? That is that. That's pretty close. I think on the same parallel is where we are in Rochester, right, except you rain more there, right. Yeah, yeah, rich and I grew up in the Pacific northwest, on the Seattle side, where it rains all the time, and you live across the mountains, more in the center of the State, where we get some sun and we get more snow. So so you're you're accustomed to the end of the seasons. Yeah, we get actual seasons. and Um, when rich comes he's fishing most of the summer. He's in Alaska most of the summer, but that you know, he comes home for a few days here and there and he gets he gets a little bit of summer. One Year we're up in Alaska for six weeks and when I came back I made the mistake of telling my family, oh, it was a really rainy winter this year, and then, Oh wait, I'm sorry, that was summer. That's great. Well, Mat it's gonna dig out another beer here. I am also just one more time, I want to reiterate that that salmon dissue cook today was outstanding and Kudos to you for the quality of that Salmon. It was. It was a combination of quality and execution today. So well, I'll take credit for cooking, but I'll tell you that was the best salmon I've ever had. That was really, really good. And you know, I guess I've learned a lot today about wild caught and you know, wild caught in areas that are pristine. And you know, I've always wanted to go to Alaska and my wife's not going to do the cruise thing and I've been signed off on to go do a cruise by myself. I'll go with you, all right, we're working on we will. Ye, I'll go with you. We'll do a grill this live from the from the cruise ship. So again we mentioned that we were at the UH the festival in Buffalo, The New York State Brewers Association Festival, and it was an amazing time. Again, if you want to listen to it's our very previous episode. The podcast was amazing. We had a little booth there and, by the way, I will be Jim Jim as other engagements, but I will be at the bright vibes festival recording a live grilled this uh. That's outside of Syracuse. Uh, it goes from noon till nine. It's in all it's live bands, uh food. I think over fifty craft brewers will be there. It's a big time to you event. So well, there's also a because I did the research. Unless you did, and I'm jealous, I of you, I can't go. There's this brew bag competition, which is uh beer pong, uh combination corn hole, whatever that is. Yeah, keg throwing fresh, lots of fresh food, brewery tours, fireworks, camping. You can stay overnight there. Um, party on and UH there. There are tickets available at think New York. Wait a minute to think New York, DRINK NEW YORK. Always get that mixed up. But yeah, or if you're lazy, you don't want to go to the extra website going to grow this podcast dot com. We have a link to it right now. Turning. But yes, I will be there, UM, and also another portion of the grill, this podcast team, taking the pictures. Carrie will be there as well. So we'll be there standing in farming. So we'll be interviewing the folks and everything. So alright. So what do we have next? So this came from the festival action. This is one of the gifts that we was given to us at the end of the festival. Uh. This is called teed off too. It's from what's your brewing company, which is out out in Clarence. Sour Ale. It's a Sour Ale blended with blackberry, Tangerine and earl gray tea to provide a fruity but crisp sour. Uh, this one by bringing it back down a little bit. This is a four point five good. So everyone can we can survive and still the show. And again it's from West Shore Brewing Company, what's Your Brewing Dot Com? And they were at the festive. Excuse me, they were at the festival. So it was a good time that, Michael. Here you go. All right, let's give it a shot here. Um, I'm not had a beer with tea in it before, but yeah, I try anything once. Wait, you did. You have the resurgence on the teeth and that was deliciou. Yep, that was a good one. Thanks...

...for reminding me of that. Oh by the way, Matt Um, finally this week got to bottle the two thousand Salmon Ranch Cherry wine we've been sampling. There's a bottle right there for you and your lovely wife She's gonna thank you if I have something. All right, you know how much we sampled that every every time we came in for a grilled list. We drank half of it before I got the bottle of all right, let's try it. Well, that is different and it's a little a little different here. So you get the Tangerine. That's that. That not very sweet, but that orange taste is there. But the aftertaste is the tea. Yes, I was just gonna say that. And Uh, and it's a sour yes, it is just a good beer. It is. It's not. It's not sweetie at all. Really, it's it's it's definitely sour. The last couple of Beers we had a little sweetness to it. That, uh, that that I can't this one here had like a little salty taste the stout. I'm sorry, I had like a little bit of a sweet and salty type taste, a little pineapple. This one is more of a sour and bitter taste to it. But but it's very flavorful. This would pair well with a wild Alaskan fish. Well, cheers to you. Now, are you into the whole wine pairing thing at all? With the food yourself if you Um, I didn't know. There is a whole world of wine pairing and I'm into it as far as I like to give my fish to a winery and say hey, tell me what pairs. Really Very Wise, very wise answer. You know, with the first time she popped up on the screen I knew she was smart. You know, normally our our goal here is to get you to say something that will ruin your life. But you know, you're smarter than weird she's been. She's been. That's great. So I have another question about fishing. So as far as a career, because you your family has been doing this for a while now. Um, is it a sustainable career? Is it? Is it? Does it provide you, uh, necessary funny to live your life, or do you have to do like side hustle jobs? You like that, or can you? So if someone wanted to be a fisherman and wanted to make that their living, that's what they did. Do you still think that's it's an industry that you can you can do and still have a decent life doing? Yeah, that's a really good question, because what we see and and just you know what we are, which is family. You know, a fishing family and my husband has a career in fishing. That would be different than a guy going out on a boat a few summer to earn some money. So can you provide for a family? That's a really good question because, Um, yeah, you can if you've been doing it a while. It is a little bit hard to break into. Fishing can be what do I call it a proud polygamy Um. It is often handed down to family members and that's how we got involved when my when my grandpa immigrated from Norway, each of his brothers would come over and they get him involved get a boat, and then when my dad came along, he was a father in law like my husband, rich and it was he was kind of brought into the fold and then moved from my GRANDPA's boat to my uncle's boat so that he could pass down properly. There was a lot of this and it's very strategic. So it is hard what they call in the industry is to get a chance. It's hard to get a chance on a boat and so but you do see people um to get a job. If you don't have a contact, you don't happen to have a father in law that has fishes whole life. Um, you call it walking the docks. So go to Alaska and they walk the docks and they talk to fisherman and they go I'm looking for a chance, and that would be how you get on a boat. Then you're the Green Horn. So you're the bottom of the barrel and you know hard and you've got to do the worst jobs and nobody likes you. You know, you got for a while and then moving up. So in the past people moved up more often into the wheelhouse. But in fishing there's also part of the regulation is the quota system. So, Um, you don't just grab a boat and go fish. You have to have a permit and the quota and they're not making any more permits or quotas because of the size of the pies. The size of the Pie there you can't go fish. So you have to you have to basically buy in if you want to own quota and be a career fisherman, or you could be a career deckcan. So there's there are a lot of fishing families like us, Um, but it can be a tough industry to break into without any contacts, for sure. You know,...

...that's completely different than what we experience here. Everybody's looking for help here. If you left conversation on a mirror, they would hire you right now. And it's you know, it's horrible because everybody's trying to find people. It's not and uh, that's one of the things I was going to ask. But I guess the supply chain is alive and well and in Alaska Fisheries, Huh. Yeah, and you're right. You know, it is harder to find help these days everywhere. I mean you know, everywhere, from US trying to find help they put fish in a box to you know, rich up in Alaska. It is getting harder to find help. And rich has had a couple of people. He'll have some great guys on the dock that are working for the processing facility and then a fishing boat comes in and sell fish and they leave with one of his guys. That's never fun because I know, like I know, I hate to because we keep talking about the dulliest catch and we keep referencing that show, um, but I know when they do it it's like seasonal right. They earn a they earn all their pay and like just like a couple of months time wherever and then that's it and then that they got to make that last them until the next season. Yeah, it's an unconscious amount of money, though. No, it's it's a right hip. It's a ton of money. But so is that kind of how it works for everyone? Or is there or is there stable fishing where you're getting you're getting, you know, maybe you do it for a couple of months, you're off a month and you do a couple of months and you're off a month, or do you? Or is there just a season and then the season is over, the you gotta wait for next season. Yeah, it is. Crab is really similar because the same thing. They own a permit for that so that when they go out they know how much crab they're allowed to catch and so then there's a tight season for it, and Crab seasons are short Um. But but it is similar but different. So hallibant, black cod, it's really similar. You know, a bigger boat, not that big, but bigger boat quota. But the season is open from spring to fall, so basically as soon as the weather which is really nice because they can fish in better weather, which is a really big deal for for fishermen just for hazards of the job, Um, and when it's a quota system. So Way Way back when my dad was fishing it early on, it wasn't more of a derby system where it was open. Then you go out and get what you can. Um, and if it was blowing a gale, they'd have to go out because they don't have to make their living in these tight, tight, tight windows. So that was really it was unsafe for the fisherman and they're not sleeping because they have to, you know, catch everything in these really tight windows. So crab is not is, you know, still fairly tight window. But Um, pliant black cod they have from spring toil fall. So it's a similar system, just a much longer season. And so if it's if it's bad weather, if there's a storm out there something, they can come in and they can just go well, let's go out again later. So they have a much longer time and it allows Um, you know, more safety on the boat. They can take their time, they can sleep a little bit at night, which is really nice and much more safe. And then, Um, some boats do it slightly different, but Um, they'll go for a few trips that go in and out and they come in much more often than they used to because they're keeping that fish fresh. So way back when my when my grandfather fish, they'd be loading up the boat for thirty days. They definitely don't do that anymore. When my dad fish, they would fish for a couple of weeks and now when my husband's fishing, it's a couple of days and then they go to port. They're trying to sell that fish when it's still really fresh and then they go back out. So and then they're checking the weather. They go back out when the weather is good. So so they're in and out and sometimes they'll take a layup for a couple of weeks and everybody will go home. is so when he's out on the boat, is their Internet there and cell phone service that you can talk to him? Um Much better now. So when my dad was out, there would be a sat phone and you know it was like, Oh, we get home and there'd be a call on the answer machine. Oh he missed the one call. Maybe he'll try and you know, kind of a thing. And when rich is salmon fishing in most of the areas he has um, he has cell reception and and he's when you know, he's always working and he's always selling fish and he's on his phone and he's fishing and selling fish, and I mean he's practically sending a photo of him catching a fish to a chef. You know looks like but there are still spots without sell and then when he's Longlining, it'll be a few days at a time where, you know where we might not be able to reach him. Matt, you gotta dive over there and grab that last because we're contract contractually obligated to drink that some of that last Um, I wanted to ask you. Do you do your does your fish show up in some of the finest restaurants in the country? Um, well, it should. Well, that's why...

...grilled this podcast, we really focus on direct to consumers. So we're talking to people and what we have found is that restaurants want the best, but they also wanted to be really easy and they don't want to pay for the best. And we have found going straight to consumers and saying hey, this is us, we fish, here's how we take care of our fish, they you know, people love that connection and they love knowing who caught it and how to care for it, and we have a more direct communication actually then going through a restaurant and a chef. So we, Um, you know, have actually enjoyed much more really talking directly with the consumer and they really enjoyed having our fish at their house. Absolutely, absolutely. All Right, Matthew, you're up. All right, for the last one of the day and of the show. We go. We go back to more talents because we had an obviously more challenge shop for. You can tell we love this place. So we went with a straight up stout this one. So this one is a stout that that is going to be your traditional dark color. Um, it's called chaos. Uh. So it just says imperial stout. There's no other thing put put under about the ingredients and it's at a ten percent. So we're we're ending with the bang. Yeah, so, I'm sorry you're not here with us. You would enjoy this. It's a lot of fun. Sorry, you weren't. You weren't going anywhere. Word. I live here. Here we go, I get more Talus. Uh, this work. This was from here. Matt Wilson. Yeah, that's a sound heard around the world. Oh my gosh, that's like that's like syrup. So that is wow, the traditional dark, dark stout color. Wow, that looks like coffee. It's just look like coffee and they didn't put the ingredients right. No, so we'll have to it's like oil. It's like I'm pouring oil into a cup. Well, we won't call it oil. It's got coffee and it's got all kinds of stuff. You can smell it. Yeah, here we go. Oh, that's good. You know what this tastes like? Um, M hm. That bourbon bail barrel age, but without Bourbon. Um. It's it's very good. It's very that is a traditional stout. It's got a little sweetness to it and not strong, but a little bit of swetness to it's pretty good, kind of Creamy, but very dark. Um and thick. Yes, and again at you might want to only do one. You want to call it a day at that. So we're coming to the end here. I just want to remind everybody that this weekend, this sad today is what do you call that bright fright? Yeah, Matt Wilson will be down there with the podcast microphone. Uh, it's in Syracuse. You can go to think New York, DRINK NEW YORK DOT com. Girl, this PODCAST DOT COM. There's a link right there. You can get tickets. You can stay overnight camp. There's all kinds of stuff. It's a giant party. Paul and his cruise. They do a great job. Matt and I were at Buffalo Canal side there. It was nice to see that the US s Sullivan's was right, that that was good. And this is the grill list podcast. You can reach us on Iheart, uh, spotify, apple, wherever you get your podcast. The Sammy ranch cowboy. I'm getting tired. The SAM SAM and ranch cowboy cooking show number two is up. Number One. If you haven't seen it, check that out. That's on Youtube. Youtube Sam and ranch cowboy cooking show. And today's guest Sina Wheeler. She used a third generation fisherman or fisherwoman or Fisher person with senus. She fishes right snus C S E, N A S E, a day shift. Uh Fish all over the country, all kinds of fish, almost anything you could think of. Crab when it's in season, the freshest of the fresh. Matt and I had this this potato crusted uh salmon from the Copper River, which was awesome. It was Berm Uh say it again, bear Brown, Bear Brown. It says Blanc, but is silent because I went on one of those websites that says it, so I know it. I didn't like it sound like a dope break, but it's been so fun talking to you, Sena. Thank you so much for taking time out of out of your schedule and and Um, you know, let's stay in touch. We'll have you back again. How's that? Yeah, thanks for having me. This was really fun. I'll have to bring rich next time. I don't know what your language tolerances but we'll have the well, we we, uh, you know,...

George Carlin passed away, so we don't care. Whenever you want to come up with that would be fine. It would be fun to have him too, because that would open up a whole bunch of fun stuff for, uh, for you know, for us to talk about. So it'd be great. So we're always welcome to come back. Check out send US see DOT com. There's gift cards, a great blog, a million recipes there, uh, and and Um, you know, I made a little extra piece of this fish for my wife tonight and she loved it, so now I have to go back and get some more. So it'd be great. I'm sorry to my wife carry that. Send the content thank you, Sena. Thank you very much. Thank you, guys. Appreciate it all right. We'll be back next week for another edition to Grill List, Matt Ugh T, Wilson, the t. Then we'll stand for um terribly. I love it. UH, facebook, spotify, I heart apple. UH, Jim Salmon, DOT DOT COM, grill this podcast, dot com. What do I miss? Dot Com, dot com cares, but we'll be back next week for more of Grill is.

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