Grill This!
Grill This!

Episode · 1 year ago

Air Fryers and "The Stall"

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this Episode, Jim and Matt sample a craft beer from Thin Man out of Buffalo called "Minkey Boodle" and talk air fryers. Also, Jim goes into the mail bag and explains the cooking term "The Stall".

Hey, everybody, welcome to grill list. My name is Jim Salmon, along with that great pit master Matt Wilson. What's going on? How are you man? How are you? Wonderful? What we're gonna Grill and cook everything was ever meant to be grilled cooked. And we have some great craft beers. Oh Man, I brought a brought an award winner today. Jim Excellent and at work. So this beer that I brought, it's as wars beer. So so this is what I want to do, Jim. Each week we're going to go back and forth because, as we discussed in our opening episode, we kind of both like beers from all over the spectrum, all over, all over, Yep. So I don't want to stay on one we're going to go all over the place. All right. So today we're going to start off with this hour and then will next week we'll decide on something else to do. This sour is an award winner from the New York State brewers associated. So what's the name of it? It's it's canned by thin man brewery and Buffalo and the name of it is called Minky bootle Hanky, bootlenky bootle Nice. It's a raspberry sour. Seven percent, yes, sir. Yeah, and comes into pink can, sixteen ounce, Yep, and Oh, I can't wait to try that. Yeah, so how long are you going to make me wait? You know, about how about before we even start talking about food? Let's go ahead and crack this right. Here we go, folks, listen up. Don't you just love that sound in the world? Well, let's try it, all righty. Oh, is that good? That delicious. Yeah, now, that is a sour. That is a sour, but it's not over the top. So No, it's not face puckering Sour, and the raspberry definitely comes through in that. And it's not overly sweet, and that's the problem with some of the sours, especially the fruited so ours, as you get too much sweet, right, and this doesn't. It has you can taste the raspberry, but it's not really really sweet. All. That is wonderful. That is absolutely wonderful, and it's made here, right, fifty miles yeah, this is a this is a when you buy these beers, which is very important to me, especially in the current times, I like to buy beers that are local, because you're supporting the local businesses. That I've been struggling through this whole thing. So, especially the craft breweries that couldn't have indoor dining, and right indoor. Yeah, I'll of course the drinking thing here is you had to buy food and whatever and all that, but it made everything so much more difficult, very difficult, and I come from this that we're going a message. I come from. I come from this industry, that the brewing in the and the restaurant industry. That's kind of where I got my feet wet, would you know, when I first heard to work. So I it's near and dear to my heart that we support these guys, and especially when they make a great product. is absolutely very, very important. So if you're a person that likes to try new things, seek out and go visit your your local craft brewer either. They all have unique names. Yeah, you know, knuckle head, you know to this for that, three heads. Yeah, Right, godfather of the craft brewery here, robot or box. They've been around forever and they're really, really good. Scotch ail. We Love Roar Bock, Scotch Im or may not a power of those last night. Yeah, you buddy, good for you, boy. This this raspberry sours excellent, delicious. So are you? What are you going to talk about today? What's your topics? So today I'm gonna kind of go off the actual grilling aspect, which we usually stick to, and a good friend of ours, but a name of Mr John Welch, kind of got me on the air frying. So I have to air friars and I know my first attempt at air frying was terrible, Uh Huh,...

...and I've since learned how to actually do it correctly. So I want to give some tips and suggestions so people know how to properly air fry things. Now, in the middle of the winter here in western New York, sometimes it's a little more difficult to get outside, although those of us that are pit masters, and yeah, I'll think, we're though, yeah, well, you're going to shovel snow to get to the consolutely. However, the the Air Friar can take things we normally would do on a grill, like chicken wings or whatever, and just do them great right in the kitchen. Absolutely and the thing is they can turn out exceptionally well if you do it right. So you just got to know what you're doing. If you do it wrong, it could be a mess. But if you do it right, it could actually I won't say it's as good as the grill because the girl gives it a unique flavor, obviously right, but you can still have a very great product if you do it that way. Well, what are your favorite things to cook in an Air Frar? Well, obviously we're gonna chicken wings are near and here to my heart. I can do the pork steaks, pork chops, you can do ribs, but you got to be careful. If you do ribs, you can also do burgers. That very easy to do burgers in there. You can even do if you have, if you have a sizeable a big air friar, you can even do things like a like a small chicken, like got like a small whole chicken right now. The Holy Grail of air frying is, of course, crispiness. Yes, and so do you have a secret for that? I mean, what do you? I know what I do. So, so here's the thing. So we're I'M gonna give two suggestions on this. So there's the breaded wings, right, and there's the regular crispy skin type chickenly right. Right. The Secret, ladies and Gentlemen, at John Roll plase is oil. Okay, oil, and whether you use an actual light coating of real oil or if you have one of those like Pam style spray can oil or Air Sawt oils, you got to hit it with that oil before you put it in there. If you do not, you're going to come up with something that's going to be dry and and sometimes messy, especially with breading something. So with breading Jim, you can't use wet breading. Has To be dry. It's got to be dry breading. So when they say in the recipe dry off the scallops are dry off the chicken wings, they can't be soaking wet because if you put that on there it's going to immediately be wet and that's counterproductive. ABSTRASS be and successful cooking a bread and things in an air FRA asked. Absolutely, okay. So if so, if you're going to put let's say breading on a chicken wing, it's got to be like a dry bread, like a corn bread or like a flower or whatever you're using for your breading. It's got to be dry. So the secret to getting it on there the right way, though, as you take your wing, you spray it with this airsol oil. You Roll it in the breading, just spray it again in the air, so it's all oil. You spray, you're great, the the one that you use for your air fire where you're going to lay the chickenings on. You spray that with the oil too, so it doesn't stick to it. Then you put it in the Air Fryer. Then you set it always to the highest level, highest temperature, always at least four hundred degrees. Now Chicken Wings go twenty minutes or so. Right. Yes, that's usually what I do. Right. And how often do you flip me around? I usually do it at least halfway through. Now, sometimes I'll if I see it's cooking quicker than I thought it was going to, because you got to keep your eye on these things. That's and there's we talked about in all all grill aspects. You got to make sure you're watching what you're doing right. If you don't, you can things Canna go bad. But if you see it's starting to crisp up on one side, flip it to the other side, the other side, so you can get it to crisp up on the on that side also. And again, like we talked about, on girl. This failures always and up and you know everything's outible, but to what degree and how much you like it? Right? But when you come out with perfectly cooked chicken wings or a pork steak or or whatever you're cooking in your air fur, you're...

...trying to think, how did I get here? How did I do it, so I can do it again right and can see the test I did Jim as I have. My parents were my house and they have never eaten anything from air far before. Okay, and my dad is from the southeast, from Kingstree, so okay, so he knows good food and he sees it. Okay. And you know country fried anything is what they do really well on the south. So I wanted to do Britt at chicken wings and I want to see if you could tell if I didn't do it, you know, and Natural Friar. Okay, he had no idea really, he thought that I fried them for real. You Won. That's a way good. So word. That's Matt Wilson, Ladies Down, that's great. Well, you know, if you don't have an air friar, don't be afraid to go out and get one and experiment with it, because you could cook just about anything. In there. There's a list of like seven things. You never cooking an air for ever. But you know, I mean, it's it's just about experimenting with food and and and trying to please your family. Know You, you will here for her to Myke. I do, I do. I don't use it as much as I probably could because any chance I get to hit the outdoor kitchen, even when a zero out. Sure. And you know last and our initial episode of grilled list, we talked about that breast getting firing up the pellets grill at five degrees. You know, that thing's amazing. It's it is so cool. It is so cool. So I also want to talk a little bit about that because I got some email this this week in response to our initial episode of Grill this. Everybody seemed to have fun and put it on their list. I saw that and now you're the technical expert of girl this and the executive producer of girl this. So so just tell the people where they can get this podcast. Just so. Yeah, absolutely, I'm glad you mention that because I don't want to forget that. Of course, we are part of the IHEART family. So you can go to iheartcom and just search grill this and you will find our beautiful looking podcast. It's available right now. Also, I believe, Jim, it's on your website as well. It is. You can go to Jim salmoncom. There's a link right to grill this. I have no idea where it goes, but it gets the girl this. I also have it on my website, which is inside the margins radiocom grilled. This is available there as well, and also wherever you get your podcast. So we are across all podcasting platforms. Here we go. Now the email know that I received this week was we were talking last week about what was called the stall. Yes, and most people don't understand anything about what we're talking about. So I thought we'd take it from the beginning of justolute cover that whole thing. The stall is basically when you have a larger piece of meat, say a roast or a brisket, sometimes even a you know, a thick Tomahawks steak. Oh, by the way, I have seven brand new thirty two ounch Tom let me know it. It did tighten the Fraser ready to go whenever you can. and Oh, I smell another episode of drill this I think so. So the stall is when you're cooking a bigger piece of meat, like like a brisk at, a roast or a thick steak or whatever, and you get it when it gets up to about a hundred and fifty, hundred fifty five degrees, it stops climbing and dust the stall. It's stalls in its climbing in temperature. And the stall is it can be anywheres, from three hours to maybe even for six with a brisket, sure. And what happens there, and it's so simple and easy to understand. There's been all these wives tails about the stall and yet o their goofy things and chemical reactions and all that stuff. But really what's happening there is when the temperature gets to a certain point, around a hundred fifty degrees, it starts to evaporate the moisture in the piece of meat. And it's if you and I hate to bring this analogy and but it's it helps you understand it. It's like when you on a hot day, when you're sweating,...

...that's how your body cools itself right. Well, it's the same thing with a piece of meat gets to a certain temperature, starts to evaporate it and that cooling balances out the heat and everything's kind of stays the same. Hundred fifty degrees right, and it can last a while. Sometimes the stall doesn't even happen and you can't explain that other than maybe the marbling or the Collagen in the meat wasn't as much as it was in a previous piece or whatever. But you have to wait out the stall and, like if you're cooking a breast, get your goals to get it from, you know, one hundred and fifty, one hundred and fifty five at the stall, up to two thousand three ten something in that area, and sometimes you have to just wait it out. There's really nothing you can do about it. Some people will rush over there and crank the town jaws. Good, I was going to ask you. So what happens if someone does that? What happens if someone goes there says, what's happening with this? I'm nervous and they creak up the temperature? It? It will, it will stop the stall or slow it down or correct it quicker. But you're also sacrificing a little of this slow and low, low and slow right, right. So, and you don't want to affect the overall tenderness of the meat. The goals the hardy, right, you know that? That's what I was kind of getting that, because it's important to keep your meat moist, right. You don't want to dride out piece of meat right at the end of your adventure. So if you try to rush things by overheating, you can lead out to an overcooked, dry piece of meat. When you're grilling something on a charcoal grill or a Comodo Joe Ceramic smoker or Palette Grill, you know, l one thousand two hundred, Black Label, Louisiana or whatever. You're official. Really, the official rule will be grill this pocket. Yeah, exactly. And you have all these great people over and you know they what time should I get there? I'll get there around three o'clock. You've been cooking all day and all of a sudden your roast or pulled pork or whatever you're cooking, breasket or whatever, supposed to be timed out around for eighty five. You know that kind of thing, all of a sudden at stalls. Now you have to resist the impatient thing, right. Yeah, you just have to go from the foot with the flow, you know. So that's important. So I want to so I have to ask you because when it comes to grilling, almost always, in some cases it's not the quite the same, but almost always time and patients is key, because we're cooking low and slow from the most part, right, right. So you so you have to be patient with these things out and so many things come into play. The quality of the piece of meat that you get. Now, we talked about this before and we'll probably talk about this a thousand other times. Go into your local butcher is infinitely better than going to a big box and buying cry all pack something or other. You know that crowd packed, vacuum packed meat is is okay for everyday life and whatever, but it's it just it allows the grocery stores, especially the big boxes, to have this stuff on the shelf for three weeks without having to worry about it. Right. But when you go to your local butcher and say hey, I want this pulled pork and you know this pork butter or shoulder whatever and that breasket, sometimes you get and most of the Times you get up much better cut of meat, which is a win all day long. That's what you want. Another question I want to ask you, Jim, how important is, because you mentioned this and I'm glad you said it. marbling. MARBLING is the key, is the key of the key. Now there's a big difference between a dairy cow, Yep, and a black angus, yes, horner face pastor so you can have marbling in both, and that that dairy cows always going to be tough. Yeah, I mean it's just I don't know it. I always have this philosophy. I I look at it as a professional challenge, a personal challenge to go and buy the worst cut of meat once in a while, Jack Card whole thousands of holes in it, feet tenderizer...

...and try to get it to taste good. But it's a lot of work when you could be buying a better cut of meat. Is it more expensive to buy that better but absolutely. And, and you know the old saying, you get what you pay for, right, and especially, I don't know about you, but I love cooking for a bunch of people. Absolutely, and I don't want to be embarrassed either. Work. Well, look over there and one of my friends are trying to hack through this thing like that with a and you know, sometimes I have friends that have sense as a humor. Jim, can I borrow your hacks off right, or can hate you have a saws on the shop I can use? You know. The other other thing I wanted to talk about to was people ask me all the time I'm in patient, mm and when a piece of meat is done, especially a good steak or whatever, and it's it's against I mean you actually might have to unfriend somebody that cooked a steak well done. But you know, just keep don't know. Don't send me an email. Listen, I'm before you can continue, I'm going to tell you. If you cook steaks well done, you may be listen to the wrong part. I agree with you, but the resting time after you take I didn't initially understand how important it was to hang on a little bit and relax. When you take that steak off. You don't have to run right in, throw it on the plate and have everybody picked their steaks and hack into it. Give it a few minutes. A good cooked ribb I should the rest should be five to seven minutes M now. It's not going to cool down that much. Now. If you overcooked it, then that's another matter. But I I resist cutting into a steak to try to see where I am with it, because it once the juices pop out, that's counter product. Back. Yeah, you can't go back. What you do that either. And I also received an email based on our podcast last week, grill this, that said when you put a probe in there, even a putting a probe in to your breast getter steak, and then you pull that probe out, it lets juice is out. Now what I do is I let the I keep the probe in there because I want to know, I want to be as good as I can, and it's our good thermometer. Use really gives you a better result in the end. I'm convinced to that sure. And so I leave the probe in even while it's resting, so I don't pull it out run when the rest is done, you know, then that's that's what you do. I'm glad you mentioned the resting. I know we touched on that a little bit and our initial episode of grilled this, but resting is a lot more important than people actually understand. A lot because, because what you said is absolutely true, when you're done cooking and you see it came out great, some people rush to put it on the plate so fast because it looks great and they want to die right in. But if you want you got to give the meat the time to let the juice is, you know, kind of absorbed back into the meat, into the me and make it softer. And if you want to do that you gotta let it rest. So the statement that letting a piece of meat, whether it's a steak, a park bud, breast get or whatever, let it rest after you take it off the heat, let it rest, equals a better tasting piece of absolutely and and that's a when. Now, on a brisket it depends on how thick it is, but on a brisket, an hour or two is not unusual. If, especially if it's wrapped in a towel and you put it in a cooler or whatever, you can't imagine how much better a brisket will be, more tender, more juicy on the inside if you let it rest a proper amount of time. Yeah, and stakes less, some less time because it's thinner and whatever. So speaking of that, by the way, our our cooking show will be out pretty soon too, and I want to lude back to that as well, because we did a brisket on that. That cooking show we did, and you let that thing rest for a...

...while and that I have to tell you, Jim, I've eaten a lot of brisket over my time. That had to be one of the JUICIEST, tenderest briskets I've ever tasted. Even I was stunned. And you know, in the interest of full disclosure, here we were filming and going back and forth and lots of things going on and ingredients flying around and whatever. And and by the time we played at everything, with everybody sitting out on the patio and whatever, explaining what we cooked and and finishing up filming the show, by the time we got to the brisket, it was two and a half, almost three hours of rest. Yeah, but it was because I had to probe in there. It was still a hundred fifty degrees in the center of the brisket it and it was awesome. There was a movie. Was Amazing and and and again, in the interest of full disclosure, part of that was by accident. ha ha ha, Gush. That's great, but that's still tells you how important resting is and if you have the patient to let patients to let something like that rest that long. I'm not saying everything has to rest that long, obviously, right, but if you have the patients to actually give it time to sit there and rest, you can end up with something like that, an amazing Cud of meat. Right. And because I get all the email, somebody reached out to me and said, and I quote, not everybody can afford one thusive hundred dollar pellet. Girl. What else? How do I what's my entry level? For A hundred bucks? You can go to a hardware store and buy a grill. That you can. You can grill low and slow, absolutely direct cooking. You can. You can start right at the bottom. Maybe at the end you have you just it's too frustrating and you don't like it. Probably not, but you know you only have a hundred dollars into it. Right. And when you graduate and say okay, now, maybe this Christmas I want to come Outo Joe, classic Joe Smoker Grill, once you learn how to use that and play with it in adjust the incoming flow and you become a pit master, right, you're gonna love you can cook anything that you could get it a fine dining rust. Absolutely. It's a good point and I understand that not everyone can jump right into thousand dollar grilling units or any or accessories. So I understand and you're Soue. You're right. You can. You can start off with a small charcoal grill and you can try to do what you can to manipulate the temperature it, control that to make whatever you want. and to me, Jim, if you can learn how to use a charcoal grill low and slow, and I'm talking to cheap charcoal grill, you're probably going to be okay when you get to the bigger thing. Right, right, you're going to have practiced and practiced and practiced, and on future podcasts of grill this we're going to cook anything, everything you ever thought Oholekhya, a whole hogs coming up, Tomahawk grills, Tomahawk on the Pellet Grill, Tomahawks on the Komodo Joe. We're going to cook that up here on grittle this and you're going to hear seat it, probably too. And Craft Beers. have another sip of this. Minky boodle, Minky Monky bootle. Yeah, it's a weird name and I wasn't sure how much I was going to like it, but it's delicious. It's a very tasty craft beer. That is very, very good, and now that I have had minky doodle or Minky boodle from this craft brewery, I'll be checking out whatever other types. Yeah, a really this thinman brewing company on on Buffalo has made some other award winning peers. So I'm always excited when I run into other breweries that I've not really drinking a lot of beer from right and this is one of them. I have had their IPA now here's the thing that things...

...about IPA. A lot of times when you drinking IPA it makes your facebooker. It's kind of bitter and it's happy. It's very happy. Thanks Jim. That's that's the correct that's the correct term, and that can be a little off putting to some people. So in order to have an ip that kind of goes across where everyone can enjoy it, you got to take the sting off that bitterness a little bit. You want you still want the flavor of it, but you want that sting of that, that extreme bitterness. Take it off, and they do that with their IPA. I've had it. Okay, there's a couple of other IPEAS that would later on and other episodes will I'll bring in because I know you're not an IPA guy. I am not, but every once in a while somebody says here, try this. I know you don't like IPAs, but try this. Wow, nice, so that you're right about the bite. Yeah, so that's what I'm going to do. I'm going to and some of the episodes that we do I'm going to bring in some of the IPAs where I think that I might be able to sneak it by and you might be like, this is actually not so bad, and I would even tell you that it's nip right. When you come in to the studio here to record, record, grill this, wrap it with manella paper, cut up a bag, so I don't know what it is. There you go. That's but don't you worry, we'll do we'll do our styleton reporters to will we're all or cover the gay. By the way, I want the backtrack to the to the air friar, because there are a wide variety of different kind of air friars out there. Right now I have two of them, and again I'll everyone doesn't have to buy two of them, but I have. I have two of them. So there's one where it's the kind where you put it on there and it can be used as an indoor grill and also an air friar, okay, and the other one I have is just a standalone air friar. Here's my suggestion. If you are trying to get crispy air fried food, don't get the dual one. Go for the Standard Air Friar, plane air fring, because it's got that Open Mesh looking great that you put the meat on at the bottom right and it lets more are through to do it to properly air fry, whereas the other one it's got little tiny holes in it but there's a lot of metal on the bottom of it. Okay, so you get more of a grilling effect than an air fry effect. So you will end up with like grill marks on your chicken wings with a little bit of crispy crispinis versus on the other air friar it's all crispy. So if you're so, if you want something that where you can do both, then you can. Obviously you'll go get that one. If you if you know it's too cold, you want to grill some food but you don't want to go outside, then you can get that unit. The end there's multiple different ones that they do that with, where it's a it's a grill air friar, and that one cost little bit more too. But again, for as far as crispy air food, it does not work as well as the traditional Mesh Air Friars. Of course, the big name, I think, and in air friers is like Ninja food. That's the one. I was avoiding that, but yes, the one, the one that's the grills are friars and Ninja footy. That I have, okay, and then I have a known name brand like smaller, just generic air friar, and that one are fries. The food better than a Ninja foody does it okay, and the Ninja footies. You Take Care Wallet With You. Then your food is expensive and that's why. If so, if you're listening to this, I watch and if you're just strictly going for air frying, I don't want you to spend a ton of money on something that you're not going to get to the perfect results on. Right, right back to the grilling a little bit of there's different things that people grill on gas grills are great. I know hot dogs, hamburgers, a steak once in a while, or what or whatever. I mean, that's, says, probably the mainstay in America. Everybody has a gas grow. It's quick and there. Yes, quick, it's easy. I don't clean mine enough either, and every once in a while something catches fire and Yep, and and. But when you're ready to go off that and get back to charcoal, because when I grew up, that's there were no gas all we used to and I was that we had charcoal and...

I remember my dad just, you know, bags of charcoal or thirty cents, and here we had these little, a little teeny metal girls that, you know, with a great on top of whatever, and we had a bunch of those when I was grown up and that was great. But now we have some really nice charcoal grills. The Webber Line is good and that's a that can be a smoker if you figure out how to do that. And there's a hundred other brands of charcoal girls which give you the better taste, you know, if you have the patients to light, to chart and wait for. I never, ever, ever, by that charcoal that has the automatic lighting fluid in it. No, no, because if you do use that, and I I go against that too, you have to wait till that. You will it's cooked completely off. All right, meeting the charcoal bricketts have to be completely white before you put food on it. If you don't, you will taste fuel in your food. YEA, and it's I assume it's some form of just lighter fluid, just like the regular lighter fluid would be. And those of you that have smoker girls, Komodo Joe, big green egg, that kind of thing, you never, ever ever use start a fluid in those because the ceramic will absorb some of that smell and you don't want that transferred to your food. So what I use as a torch, flamethrower. It is really cool. I love it because I'm in patient, you know. I'll use a torch and put it in a few different places in there and I'll wait for it to heat up. Some people use the charcoal chimney. Yep, which is fine them. The chimney takes a little longer than I usually have and some of us are, you know, more patient than others right comes to that. But I have attribute and you know, it's a I think also the type of charcoal that you use. The main brands are great Kingsford, of course, a big name, you know, and the grilling circuit and and whatever. So I think that that the brand of charcoal that you buy is sometimes has an effect on how long something burns. Now I can put charcoal in either one of the ceramic grills and have it go for, I mean hours and out the big one twenty four hours. It's still warm at twenty four hours, which is amazing. Yeah, and that's the whole loan slow that'd be for brisket or whatever, you know, but it's great. It's all good and I think that most people have a little bit of a cooking gene in them and some people just may not know it. Yeah, and one of the things we talked about all the time and we'll continue to talk about, is you're gonna mess up. It's it's inevitable. And try spices, try fresh crack pepper, fresh coarse salt sea salt that grind up. Yeah, I mean you can't, you can't. Somebody will like it right, Yep. So I want to get back to what you're talking about with the the gas girls, and you're right, most people have one and it's to me, and this is just my opinion, and you know, if you think differently. If that's fine. I use those just for quick cooking, you know, if I'm I got the kids want some dogs, so and throw some hot dogs on a griller or some cheeseburgers or something like that. Every once while, maybe, like you, a grilled chicken breast or something. All right, something quick. But if I am doing like ribs, or if I'm doing like a pork shoulder, or if I'm doing anything like that, I almost never use a gas grow for that. Yeah, I agree with that a hundred percent. I do use the gas girl a lot when I do fruits. Okay, pineapple, especially pineapple, dipped in everything you can come up with a little honey or some people use that fireball Jack Daniels on their pineapple and then you grill it and you right, you get a little bit of...

...a char on both sides. It is awesome. And you can do vegetables that way or whatever. I used usually do that on the gas grow because I don't want to open something that I'm going low and slow with. But you know, that's a win. No, you're right, you're absolutely right. I'm with you on that. You know what I bought the other day and I don't normally use. Actually want to get your pain on this, because it's I don't know if you use it before, the little grilling mats that you put on top of the greats. So if you're going to cook, let's say, fish or something like that, you don't want it to fall through the greats. It's recommended that to use a grilling mat, which I've cooked fish on the grill before. I've never used a grilling mat for before. I just bought one yesterday. It's perfect for fish. I use them. They're expensive, yes, they are not in it, you know. I mean it's ten or fifteen bucks for two of these little mats and whatever. And I my grill, which gets pounded every single day all summer long. I mean every day, almost it. It gets messed up, you have to clean it and you this and you that and whatever. And if you cook fish on at one minute, you can't cut a burger on it the next thing without cleaning it, you know, and it. But they do perform an indirect cooking barrier, I guess, on some things that you that might be easier to have fall apart on you on a great like fish. You know, and I'm a firm believer in taking a rag and putting some good oil down on my great on whichever grill I'm using. It kind of makes things slide off. So when you run the SPANTIL and yet it doesn't stick. But yeah, I like those. Those match. You'll find it interesting. You also find they don't last as long as you'd like them to. I didn't think they wouldn't. That's why I kind of avoided it for it because I have a friend who uses them. He throws them out all the time because it because he'sn't like to clean them. Yeah, so, but the other question I wanted to ask you. If you're using a grilling matt, like, let's say, for a fish, and you're cooking it over a charcoal grill, does that hinder any of the smoke from the charcoal penetrating the fish at all? Maybe a little bit, depending on if you have I my guess. Girl, I have a like a five burner deal, and so if I'm on this side, I'll turn the other burner on on the other side that's not under the Mat. Okay, so maybe I'll get a little bit more there, but I don't think I use grape seed oil on those mats. Okay. which grape seed oil has this? I don't know the chemical because I'm not I'm just a simple country by. It doesn't burn it nearly the temperature that other oils would write and it and it has no taste. Okay, so it allows me to work that Matt a little better without it affecting the taste and I find that stuff doesn't stick to it as much because, which is good, which is important, and it doesn't all of a sudden start flaming up on me. I'm glad you mentioned that, because that was my final question. Is, what kind of oil would you use there? Because obviously, if you're trying to just get the flavor of the grill or the smoke that's coming through, you don't want an oil on there that's kind of overpower that taste. Right, you know what I mean? Right, absolutely, and grape seed oil has almost no taste to it and it's like anything else if you pound it right. But you just if you use it the way you're supposed to do, it has no tastes. Okay, that's a that's a win for me. I'M gonna have to try that out probably this weekend. Most pit masters have a favorite oil that they go to. Grape seed oils a little bit more expensive and you don't buy as nearly as much of it and you don't use as much either. So but a vegetable oil, cornile whatever, all those oils that are trying to kill you from day one, they all they eventually they get to a point and they just burn, start smoking whatever, and grape seed oil doesn't seem to do that. Yeah, I use olive oil a lot, but again with olive oil there's a unique flavor to that. All right, so if you're cooking certain things that don't really require that o'live e...

...taste, you kind of throw the flavor off. So you can't use it all the time. For my wife Loves Haddock. I love had it too, so I'll I'm always buying haddock. So I'll put a piece of haddock down on one of those mats medium heat. I will then melt a quarter stick a butter. I'll put some seasoning salt on there, maybe some of the Salmon Ranch Rub that we make here, good stuff by the world, thank you sir. And I'll just pour that melt to butter over there. I'll thin slice a lemon I mean just a millimeter thicker. Put a couple of slices of lemon down on there, maybe some almond or well, not halves or whatever. Just close the grill and let it call. I'm starry. We should have brought food for this upisode. Will. We're not going to lack any food, but believe press real quick before we got one more thing I want to talk about. That we'll get out of here. Just wants to remind everyone that you can find grilled this on iheartcom I heartcom is is where you can find it. You can also find it on Jim's website, Jim Care if you can give them your website again yet. Jim salmoncom. That's Jim Salmon, like the fish, Jim salmoncom. There's a contact section there. So if you have a question or a topic you think we ought to be covering here on grill this, there's a contact section there. Send me an email, remind me what this conversation was about and we'll see if we can't get it done for you. Or particular story you want to tell us about utter and complete failure. It took a you took a fifty hour brisket and you've vulcanized it or whatever. Where do you go from here? Well, we want to hear those stories and the success story. So that's great. You know, it's I'm not usually the person on this side where I can say contact him about stuff. Yes, make sure you said emails and contact Jim if you have any questions or comments about the grilled this. Also, on my website at inside the margins RADIOCOM, you'll find grilled this and anywhere you get your podcast. Yeah, you will find real this and coming up on future episodes. I just wanted to remind you again that I have seven thirty two well Tomahawks, Angus Back Angus Tomahawks, prime beef steaks in the freezer. I also have about an eight pound prime rib sitting there. So there's a there's an episode there, and we'll come up with ribs and pulled pork. We're going to do a whole hog here on grill this coming up sometime this here. So that'll be fun. You don't want to miss a minute of it. I hope you have a place for me to crash after that here? Absolutely, we have a hundred hotel rooms right here for you. Last last thing I want to mention before we before we end the episode, beer pairing with food. Now this is something that is now important. See now, before the craft beer movement pretty much your drink, your log or your pills or your you know, your industrialized beer that's standard at every store, Budweiser, cores, whatever you whatever you're into, and you drink it with whatever meal you have. But now, because the flavors of the beers very so much and the kind of beers that are that are made, there are certain beers that go better with certain foods. Okay, now, next episode I'm going to tell you how to do that. All right, that sounds great. So, yeah, well, it's been fun and we appreciate everybody listening to grill this and don't forget, you can get it anywhere you get your normal podcast. We'll see you back on the next episode real this. I'm gonna Finish this beer. Jim, Hey, go buddy.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (62)